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Voting is millennials’ civic duty

By Editorial Board

November 3, 2014

Despite the best efforts of the Democratic and Republican parties to attract voters for the looming Nov. 4 election, young voters are less likely to participate this year than in the 2012 elections. That is regrettable because this is a vital opportunity to make their voices heard.An April 29 Harvard University Institute of Politics poll found that only 23 percent of voters ages 18–29 plan to vote in the midterm elections. Th...

The “Literary Magazine Editing” class chooses submitted poems that will be included in the annual issue of the Columbia Poetry Review, an internationally distributed poetry journal of student work, solicited works of renowned poets and public submissions.

Students learn by editing Columbia Poetry Review

November 3, 2014

After reaching its Nov. 1 deadline for submission to its 28th issue, The Columbia Poetry Review, a student-edited literary journal, is now one step closer to publication. Every fall, the “Literary...

Falafel

Falafel

November 3, 2014

AS AN ARAB, I grew up eating Arabic food, and falafel is one of my favorites. I always loved to cut a piece of pita bread in half and stuff it with falafel and hummus. The best part about falafel is th...

Chicago Fire goalie Sean Johnson blocks a shot by the Montreal Impact during the second half of an MLS soccer game on Sunday, Oct. 5.

Chicago Fire season extinguished with subpar performances

October 27, 2014

For the fourth time in five years, the Chicago Fire failed to make the playoffs. During a tumultuous season that  saw the Fire set a Major League Soccer record for most ties in a season with a total of 18, the c...

Featured Athlete: Connor McCluskey

Featured Athlete: Connor McCluskey

October 20, 2014

Connor McCluskey, a sophomore audio arts & acoustics major, is captain of the college’s Quidditch team. Quidditch, an invented sport featured in J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” series, has begun to...

Athlete Profile: Rilwan Bakare

Rilwan Bakare

By Assistant Sports & Health Editor

October 13, 2014

RILWAN BAKARE, A Chicago native and former Texas Wesleyan University Rams power forward, was introduced to basketball by one of his cousins at 10 years old. As Bakare grew up, he learned the fundamentals...

Broom, broom: Quidditch comes to Columbia

Quidditch

By Assistant Sports & Health Editor

October 13, 2014

Break out the broomsticks—the Renegades is adding quidditch to its sports roster for the first time this fall semester. Derived from the “Harry Potter” book series, quidditch is a co-ed contact...

All numbers for league dues provided by Renegades team captains.

Not all funds and games

October 6, 2014

Despite the college allocating $8,000 to the Renegades for its yearly budget, student athletes still have to pay large fees out-of-pocket to keep the teams operating. The tennis, baseball and volleyball te...

Seattle Sounders midfielder Clint Dempsey attempts to shoot past Chivas USA defender Jhon Hurtado, Sept.27

MLS finding its footing

October 6, 2014

Since its inception in 1993, Major League Soccer has gone from  being one of the lesser-followed leagues in North America to being one of its most popular.After struggling to gain recognition and resp...

CBS Sports to air first-ever all-women’s sports talk show

By Assistant Sports & Health Editor

September 29, 2014

CBS Sports Network will launch the first nationally televised all-female, weekly sports talk show on Sept. 30. The show, “We Need To Talk,” will feature prominent female athletes such as Women’s National Basketball Association legend Lisa Leslie and female boxing legend Laila Ali. In an Aug. 26 CBS Sports press release, Sean McManus, chairman of CBS Sports, said an all-women’s sports talk show should have already happened.“This is a very proud moment for all of us here at CBS Sports,” McManus said in the press release. “A sports show featuring women is long overdue, and we are thrilled to make television history this fall with the national launch of ‘We Need to Talk.’”As the first show of its kind on a sports network, there is a possibility that successful ratings for the show could lead to more job opportunities for female journalists.Danielle Dwyer, a graduate student at Columbia and editor of ChicagoTalks, said a show like this is inspiring to her and other female sports journalists.“As a female aspiring to break into the sports industry, it’s really great and positive to see a show where women sit down [and] talk sports,” Dwyer said. “We are talking about what we love, we talk about our passion ... we can all speak our mind on that front.”Teresa Puente, an associate professor of journalism at Columbia, said that while she is in favor of the show, women still need to be more involved in sports coverage.“It’s great to have women’s voices out there, but I think the bigger issue is that women need to be part of the day-to-day coverage,” Puente said. “I don’t think [this show] is a substitute for having women as the commentators or reporters in the general sports programs and [game] broadcasts.”Another highly speculated aspect of the show is how much focus will be placed on women’s sports. According to a 2013 study by the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sports, women’s sports currently receive 4 percent of all sports media coverage.Puente said the study’s coverage statistic is disturbing, but that it also highlights the need for a show like this and more collaboration with women.“That is why there is a need for this program,” Puente said. “This is a great opportunity for this show to [increase coverage for women’s sports]. However, I would also say they have to hold men’s sports accountable [for lack of coverage].”Dwyer said while she does think women’s sports should be discussed more, they have to keep viewers’ interests in mind. “I don’t think that [the show] should focus on women’s sports,” Dwyer said. “I definitely think it should be talked about because you have a lot of these former women athletes that are going to be contributing to the show. You want to make sure your content is something that people want to see. Most of society wants to see the men’s sports because those are the money makers.”According to a Feb. 5 USA Today report, the NFL made $10 billion last season alone and plans to reach as much as $25 billion per season in 2027. The NBA made about $4.6 billion last season, according to Plunkett Research, a statistics research company.The Tucker Center study, which won a 2014 Upper Midwest Emmy Award, also found that female athletes are much more likely than male athletes to be portrayed in sexually provocative poses.Susy Schultz, an adjunct faculty member in the Journalism Department and founding president of the Association for Women’s Journalists, echoed the Tucker Center study. She said the media coverage of female athletes is disproportionate as well—although 40 percent of athletes are female, they only receive a small margin of the coverage.“When [women athletes] do get the coverage, instead of [the] media actually concentrating on women’s abilities and athleticism, it’s often sexualized coverage—hyper-sexual coverage,” Schultz said. Since the show’s announcement, CBS Sports has received praise from major media outlets such as ABC, and fans have called the move bold on Twitter and other social media outlets.Dwyer said that while she is excited for the show, she also fears that its failure could hurt female journalists.“I think [the fear of failure] is why it has taken so long for a show like this to happen,” Dwyer said. “They didn’t want to put this show out there because we’re finally making strides with women in sports media. What if [the show] tanks? How is that going to affect the credibility moving forward with these female journalists? Because it will be like, ‘Well, we gave them a shot, but [the show] didn’t [perform well].’”

Liam Neeson’s ‘Tombstones’ not a walk to remember

Liam Neeson’s ‘Tombstones’ not a walk to remember

September 29, 2014

After actor Liam Neeson’s formulaic performances in critically panned, but financially successful action flicks such as “Taken” and “Non-Stop,” his new role in “A Walk Among the Tombstones”...

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has come under fire recently for the NFL’s handling of domestic violence.

Unnecessary roughness: NFL players’ violent acts against women tarnishing league’s image

September 29, 2014

 In the past two weeks, three NFL players—Greg Hardy, Jonathan Dwyer and Ray Rice—have been suspended indefinitely by the NFL or their own teams for incidents of domestic violence.The outcry from...

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