The Columbia Chronicle

Mayor Rahm Emanuel, pictured here at a City Council meeting Feb. 22, has yet to introduce a plan to implement the recent Department of Justice recommendations

Alderman, activist search for reform updates

February 27, 2017

After more than a month since the U.S. Department of Justice released its report on the Chicago Police Department and a new administration has taken office in Washington D.C., activists and aldermen are now...

Student Center funds may need back-up plan

By Editorial Board

February 20, 2017

The former Johnson Publishing Company building, an 11-story tower that housed the company that published EBONY and JET magazines and several other publications that were icons to the black community, is under consideration for Historic Landmark status, according to a Feb. 2 press release from Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Columbia purchased the building in late 2010 for an estimated $8 million, according to a June 14, 2016 Chicago Business article. Columbia planned to convert it into a library and then considered it for its proposed student resource center but decided students needed a more open space. Now, Columbia plans to use the profits from selling the Johnson building to help pay for the upcoming $50 million student center for which has hired an architecture firm to begin the planning phase completed in the 2015–2016 academic year. Now that the building is up for historic landmark status, it could be less marketable for the college because of the restrictions that go along with this designation. According to college spokeswoman Anjali Julka, the building has not been sold as of press time. Landmark status is a prestigious honor, but Columbia needs to be very conscious of whether the Johnson building can sell. If it can’t, Columbia should either halt the plans to create a new student center entirely or develop a new, less expensive concept.Though Columbia likely won’t take money out of students’ tuition to pay for the student center if the sale falls through, the administration needs to be extremely clear about how it plans to finance the building without this source of revenue.Another option is to find alternate uses for the center’s projected $50 million budget. The priority should be to fix problems students are concerned about such as getting new desks, carpets and computers and keeping tuition at the same rate every year.In its vacant state, the building is not benefiting anyone at Columbia, especially students. Though it has obvious historical significance and held in reverence by the African-American community, Columbia must be responsive to the needs of its students, which may not involve a student center. If the money isn’t available, Columbia should not even be considering pursuing it.

Some Southeast Side community members fear a neurotoxin called manganese is in the air, which can damage the nervous system, according to the EPA.

Southeast Side residents’ health at risk again

February 20, 2017

The presence of the neurotoxin manganese in Southeast Side communities’ air has left residents frustrated with the Department of Health’s repeated lack of communication over toxins emitted from ne...

Editor's Note: College tries to give students voice in DEI talks, why won’t they take it?

Editor’s Note: College tries to give students voice in DEI talks, why won’t they take it?

February 13, 2017

Columbia’s leaders in diversity, equity and inclusion are taking steps to try to receive student feedback. This would be an effective strategy to ensure all voices are heard, but students are not t...

Editor's Note: School of Media Arts buries its lead

Editor’s Note: Administrators’ downfall will be overcontrolled communication

February 6, 2017

Columbia often preaches transparency and the importance of communicating to all stakeholders, but when it comes to major happenings in and outside the college, this semester is off to a shaky start....

Facebook must be wary of viewpoint censorship in fake news battle

By Editorial Board

January 23, 2017

Facebook faced harsh criticism after people became aware that fake news stories were circulating on the social media platform during the recent presidential election, spreading false information to many voters. Prompted by widespread criticism that fabricated stories might have influenced presidential election results, Facebook’s Director of Product Fidji Simo said in a Jan. 11 press release that Facebook would be teaming up ...

Editor's Note: School of Media Arts buries its lead

Editor’s Note: Columbia needs these New Year’s Resolutions

January 23, 2017

There is no debate that 2016 was an eventful year for both Columbia and the country, with positive and negative changes. In 2017, the college needs to reflect on what happened at Columbia in the pas...

Editor's Note: School of Media Arts buries its lead

Editor’s Note: New CFO needs to bring financial confidence back

December 12, 2016

As reported on the Front Page, the college has completed its national search for a new vice president of Business Affairs and CFO. Jerry Tarrer, who will be assuming the position in January 2017, comes...

Ladies’ comedy open mic helps relieve finals week stress | The Columbia Chronicle

December 12, 2016

As part of Columbia’s De-stress Fest, a women’s-only open mic was hosted Dec. 8, at the 624 S. Michigan Ave. Building. Ladies signed up for five-minute time slots and joked about finals, holiday str...

Editor's Note: School of Media Arts buries its lead

Editor’s Note: Post-election assembly was needed long ago

December 5, 2016

In journalism school, students are quickly taught one of the most important elements of news: timeliness. Aspiring reporters  are told that doing a story or creating relevant work has to be quick in ...

Columbia’s first student-run late night show, “Columbia Tonight,” had its first live taping Nov. 18.

Students to debut Columbia’s first late night show

November 28, 2016

Drawing inspiration from other colleges and several popular late night shows, students created Columbia’s first late night style talk show, showcasing student talent and entertainment, according to the show’s creators. Kate McDermott, a sophomore television major, and Natalie T...

Editor's Note: School of Media Arts buries its lead

Editor’s Note: Staff contract is victory for union, college administration

November 28, 2016

After approximately four years of back-and-forth that included petitions, pickets, rallies and undeniable tension with the administration, the United Staff of Columbia College’s bargaining team an...

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