The Columbia Chronicle

About fUGGin’ time

By Sophia Coleman

November 5, 2012

Sorry sorority girls, but I’ve heard glorious news: The era of UGG boots may finally be coming to an end.The company reported Oct. 25 that sales are down 31 percent and it plans to slash prices. A pair of the sheepskin atrocities currently costs between $135–$200, a hefty price for marshmallow-shaped feet soaked in winter slush.“The worst is yet to come,” Sam Poser, an analyst at brokerage firm Sterne Agee, told the Huffington Post ...

GOING UNDER BY DEGREES

By The Columbia Chronicle

October 21, 2012

by Heather Schroering, Editor-In-Chief and Ivana Hester, Assistant Campus EditorThe median annual income of recent Columbia graduates lags far behind that of other colleges’ alumni, nearly $7,000 below the national median for those in the arts and media fields and $5,000 below the median for all recent U.S. college graduates, a Columbia survey shows.In fall 2011, the college surveyed 2,500 Columbia alumni who graduated wit...

Skatalites continue to jam

By Alex Stedman

October 21, 2012

Band breakups are all too common, but some bands stay active for decades.Since its formation in 1964, Jamaican ska band The Skatalites has released 15 studio albums and had a number of lineup changes after a few band members died.The current members—Lester Sterling, alto saxophone; Doreen Shaffer, vocals; Azemobo Audu, tenor saxophone; Andrae Murchison, trombone; Kevin Batchelor, trumpet; Val Douglas, bass guitar; Natty ...

Romney, Big Bird not of same feather

By Trevor Ballanger

October 14, 2012

Mitt Romney caused a media uproar with his statement during the Oct. 3 presidential debate about cutting funding for the Public Broadcasting System. Needless to say, a rather large yellow bird, whose address happens to be 123 Sesame Street, was really pissed.During the debate, Big Bird did what most creatures of the sky do best—he tweeted.“Yo Mitt Romney, Sesame Street is brought to you today by the letters F & U!” @B...

Activists find strength in collaboration

By Aviva Einhorn

February 13, 2012

Occupy el Barrio members and community activists came together Feb. 4 to voice concerns about issues faced by Chicago’s Latino immigrant population and to discuss upcoming events.Occupy el Barrio, a Pilsen-based branch of the larger movement dedicated to addressing economic and other issues faced by the community, held a town hall meeting at Casa Aztlan, 1831 S. Racine Ave. Occupy el Barrio members Crystal Vance Guerra a...

Officials unite

By Gregory Cappis

December 5, 2011

To ensure students focus more on their schoolwork and less on safety, Chicago Public Schools and the Chicago Police Department are using a new technique to help put schoolchildren’s minds at ease.The departments are collaborating with the use of the strategic control computer program, CompStat, to help deter crime in and around schools. The program is already being used by the CPD and will now be used to target crime trend...

Earth, worms, rats feed off compost

By Lisa Schulz

November 14, 2011

Earth wasn’t the only consumer benefiting from Columbia’s compost project launch in August 2011. Rats were also curious to explore the mix of fresh sandwich scraps, apple cores, leaves, soil and coffee grounds. But as winter arrives, critters shouldn’t.The Recycling Outreach Program’s new compost project was first put into action at Columbia events, like new student Convocation. College cafes were added to the food wa...

Faculty fiction books become reality

By Lisa Schulz

October 30, 2011

Like a rushing river in the rural Midwest, some short stories are quickly written and flow on, while others dry up in obsolete valleys, remaining hopeless until it rains with purpose again.Columbia’s Fiction Writing Department enjoyed a flood of 12 recently released books written by alumni and faculty members including five that are to be released within the next year.Included are a range of publications, from digital colle...

Photo aides cut out of the picture

By Lisa Schulz

September 25, 2011

A “large number” of student workers in Columbia’s Photography Department were dismissed for the fall 2011 semester because of budget constraints. The department’s annual budget was reduced by 30 percent. The Photo I academic course and the darkroom lab experienced the largest number of layoffs throughout the department.The majority of the cuts were in classroom aides who offered assistance to students with questions a...

Negotiations with P-Fac make progress

By Lisa Schulz

September 18, 2011

Columbia’s part-time faculty union, P-Fac, and representatives of the administration have been negotiating a new contract since March 2010 and are streamlining their teams so that only two members are representing each side to simplify the decision-making process.“Progress is being made in the negotiations,” said Louise Love, interim provost and vice president of academic affairs, who became part of the college’s large...

September 11: A Decade Later

By Brent Lewis

September 13, 2011

A slideshow of September 11, 2011 from around Chicago and neighboring suburbs, by the staff of the Columbia Chronicle.September 11, 2011 was a day that will forever live in the hearts of Americans forever. Being a decade later areas all through out Chicago showed their pride with ceremonies and dedications to the brave men and women who lost their lives due to the terror attack of that day.[kml_flashembed publishmethod="d...

Police forces may be redistributed

By Contributing Writer

November 22, 2010

by: Heather McGraw, Contributing WriterChicago Police Supt. Jody Weis is proposing to shift more manpower to high crime areas, to the dismay of some in lower-crime neighborhoods who are afraid they willbe shortchanged.The proposal was announced at the City Council budget hearing on Oct. 19, but the recent retirement of more than 100 officers reignited the debate leaving some aldermen up in arms.“The Chicago Police Department is currently reviewing resource allocation and...

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