The Columbia Chronicle

Alderman proposes watchmen department

By Darryl Holliday

September 20, 2010

The term “forensic audit” is mildly deceptive, though according to a growing number of city and state leaders, it could be exactly what Chicago needs.Alderman Scott Waguespack (32nd Ward) has most recently elevated the issue of a comprehensive audit through calls to open Chicago’s books.According to Adam Andrzejewski, founder and CEO of For the Good of Illinois, the issue is poised to be an important factor in upcoming ...

Despite protests, Chicago Public Schools continue with closings

By Stephanie Saviola

March 1, 2010

After months of public outrage and protests, Chicago Public Schools and the Board of Education are slowly making headway in the ongoing matter of school closings and consolidations.During the past few weeks, Chicago Public Schools removed seven of the 14 schools from the closing or turnaround list. For some concerned parents and teachers, progress is being made, but many are still dissatisfied with the news.“It is a step in the right di...

Someone you should know

By CiaraShook

November 23, 2009

Pulitzer-prize winner, famed photojournalist and beloved teacher. These are just a few descriptions John H. White has collected for himself over the years. After three decades of teaching at Columbia and working as a photographer for the Chicago Sun-Times, White continues to inspire students and readers alike. White believes in spreading something he calls PJ love and sharing with the world. Everyday, he is on a mission to inspire the people around him to do the sameThe Chronicle talked with White about winning a Pulitzer, his students and his three favorite "F-words."John H. White: I don't call myself a teacher. I don't like that term. I'm one who shares. I am blessed so much, as much as any human being and I love what I do. But for me to experience things on a day-to-day basis and to be able to go share those things with others who are dreaming to do what I do and do it with me is the biggest gift. I like to think I have been blessed with so much experience. So what am I going to do? I share it, and I give it back. It's my responsibility. That is part of my devine responsibility.What mission do you want to instill in your photojournalism, or PJ students?Photojournalism is the title we wear, but we are simply picture-taking people, simple visual servants, simple communicators. I hope all my students come in with dreams, and my goal is to give wings to those dreams, give fuel to those wings, polish those wings and let them fly. Every time someone walks out of that classroom I want them to leave with encouragement, inspiration and fresh hope. That's the real deal.What are your three "F-words" you give to students?The most important prescription I give my students are the three F-words: faith, focus and flight. I tell them to stay faithful, because without them, the world isn't complete, and to stay focused on what really counts and what really matters. But flight is the one I love most, because it's just to spread your wings and live your dreams. That's what it is all about. It's all about love for life; I love the people, the classes and the students. I love Columbia.What do you love about Columbia?It's a great institution, and it serves as a springboard for so many things. The people here allow me to spread my wings. You know, I like this place because no one puts creative handcuffs on me or my students.What was it like winning the Pulitzer Prize in 1982 for your work?Dr. King, the night before he died, gave a speech, and in that speech he said, "I have seen the promised land!" And he said I may not get there, but I've seen it. Well the Pulitzer was great and everything, but I think that if there are trillions and trillions of wires that go divinely to heaven, and there is only one that is different, well, that day I touched that one wire. I saw the promised land.Where were you raised as a child?A child? I am still a child, I haven't grown up yet!How long have you been working for the Chicago Sun-Times?I don't work for the Chicago Sun-Times. I work for humanity. I work for the world, I am the eyes of the world by the way of the Chicago Sun-Times. I work for creation and the Chicago Sun-Times serves as a wonderful vehicle through which I can share my daily work.Is there anything in particular you would like to say to the students of Columbia or any last words in general?Go out and make a difference and always think of "What will they say about me in 100 years?" And for educators at Columbia, I think there is something that they should remember: Seeds planted in good soil grow. But seeds planted in rich soil, which is the youth and minds of Columbia students, will produce rich products as they grow because of what has been planted.What was it like winning the Pulitzer Prize in 1982 for your work?Dr. King, the night before he died, gave a speech, and in that speech he said, "I have seen the promised land!" And he said I may not get there, but I've seen it. Well, the Pulitzer was great and everything, but I think that if there are trillions of wires that go divinely to heaven, and there is only one that is different, well, that day I touched that one wire. I saw the promised land.Where were you raised as a child?A  child? I am still a child, I haven't grown up yet!How long have you been working for the Chicago Sun-Times?I don't work for the Chicago Sun-Times. I work for humanity. I work for the world, I am the eyes of the world by the way of the Chicago Sun-Times. I work for creation and the creator, and the Chicago Sun-Times serves as a wonderful vehicle through which I can share my daily work.Is there anything in particular you would like to say to the students of Columbia?Go out and make a difference and always think of "What will they say about me in 100 years?" Educators should remember: Seeds planted in good soil grow. But seeds planted in rich soil, which is the youth and minds of Columbia students, will produce rich products.Have someone in mind you think we should know? E-mail us at chronicle@colum.edu.

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