The Columbia Chronicle

City eliminates free parking by lakefront

By BrittanyRodgers

September 7, 2009

On a beautiful day in Chicago, many people park their vehicles along the lakefront to enjoy their day at no cost. In the next four to six weeks, Chicago residents and tourists will no longer be allowed to park for free. Instead, they will have to pay $1 an hour."The parks have always been a place where people can enjoy themselves at minimum cost," said 5th Ward Alderman Leslie Hairston in a press release. "At 63rd Street Be...

Saving the newspaper industry

By Kelly Rix

May 11, 2009

The writing has been on the wall for some time now for Chicago's newspapers.But the city's newspaper industry seems to be nearing collapse, with its two major daily newspapers bankrupt, and many smaller weekly and community papers struggling, too.Across the country, newspapers are facing similar fates. In the past few months, several major papers have gone under or announced they might be close to it. The Seattle Post-Intellige...

Citizens still debating gun rights

By Bethany Reinhart

May 11, 2009

On May 6, a 15-year-old Crane High School student became the 36th Chicago Public Schools student to be killed by violence this year. The increasing number of Chicago Public Schools students killed by gun violence, coupled with an increased number of violent gun-related killing sprees nationwide, has rekindled the heated debate about Chicago's strict gun legislation.Since 1983, Chicago has upheld some of the most stringent gun legi...

Scoop in the Loop

By Bethany Reinhart

May 4, 2009

When I was in seventh grade, I thought my life was over. I entered a drawing contest and I won a trip to Switzerland. It was all expenses paid and a whole week without my parents in a completely different world. It was a dream come true.My tears of joy soon became tears of sorrow and confusion. Although I came to this country from Mexico when I was 3 years old, I had been living in this country as an illegal immigrant. Therefore, if I were to leave the country on that trip, there would be no way for me to come back with the rest of the group.I didn't know how to tell my teachers and friends. I was afraid something would happen to me and my family, so I didn't go on the trip. Although this happened years ago and I have since become a legal resident, immigration is something that still affects me. My situation was not a life and death one, but many immigration stories out there are.On Aug. 26, Francisco Pantaleon died in the University of Illinois Medical Center. According to the Chicago Tribune, he was 30 years old, a father of two, worked at a car wash, had no health insurance and had been living in the country illegally for 11 years.Pantaleon suffered a severe brain hemorrhage in July and had been in a coma for a month. Although this isn't the first case where immigration and health services have become an issue, his death has brought awareness to how the system handlessituations like his.According to the Chicago Tribune, hospitals are committed to stabilize patients in emergency cases. Pantaleon's family fought against the decision made by the hospital to send him back to Mexico. They feared Pantaleon was not in a healthy state to be transferred or that he would not receive the same medical treatment in Mexico as he would here.The Chicago Tribune article also said, "With the exception of pregnant women, some children and people in medical emergencies, illegal immigrants generally have no right to health care in the U.S. Long-term health care is not guaranteed even if the patients are U.S. citizens."His family is now asking for the investigation to go further and see if negligence had something to do with his death because many things remain unclear.What could have possibly stopped the doctors from telling the family that he was near death?Pantaleon's story might just help us realize the need for better health insurance for everyone. How many people actually die at home without seeking medical attention because they don't have health insurance?As far as having health insurance for illegal immigrants, I don't see anything happening at all. The health care system has a lot of flaws and needs improvement. Until then, more people will suffer, citizens or not. In a country where people from all over the world enter with hopes and dreams, there has to be a better way to deal with these types of situations

Biden discusses citywide education

By Michael Pedraza

May 4, 2009

Vice President Joe Biden discussed future education plans for the nation during his speech at the fifth annual Richard J. Daley Urban Forum, an international meeting that provides opportunities for people from around the world, at the University of Illinois at Chicago Forum on April 27.The vice president said CEOs for Cities, a national group dedicated to strengthening the next generation of American cities, conducted a st...

Off The Blotter

By The Columbia Chronicle

May 4, 2009

1. Drunken and disorderly at libraryA 29-year-old man allegedly threatened a security guard at Harold Washington Library, 400 S. State St., as she attempted to escort him out of the building for violating library rules on Sept. 9, according to police reports. The offender, who was also suspected of being under the influence of alcohol, told the security guard, "I'll throw you over this escalator." The security guard, fearing the man would assault her, detained the suspect until police arrived on the scene.2. Subway strip teasePolice were called to Subway, 604 S. Wabash Ave., on Sept. 4 after a 54-year-old man refused to vacate the premises. According to police reports, witnesses said the offender began removing articles of clothing inside the restaurant, including his shoes, creating an unpleasant atmosphere for the patrons attempting to eat in the restaurant. The offender became belligerent, witnesses said, when he was asked to refrain from taking off his shoes and clothes. The responding police officers took the offender in for processing, where he refused to give them his real name or information.3. Mind the crackAccording to police reports, on Sept. 2, police officers patrolling on the platform of the Roosevelt Red Line station spotted a man sitting in a train car placing items into small white and red plastic bags. The suspect folded the bottom of his T-shirt up to hide the items. The police officers secured the offender's hands,  and the bags, containing heroin and crack cocaine, fell out onto the seat. The offender, an 18-year-old affiliated with the Vice Lords street gang who was already on parole, was placed in custody and his parole officer was notified.4. Dude, where's my bike?A specialized gray and black bicycle was stolen from a bike rack at 600 S. Wabash Ave. on Sept. 2, according to police reports. The bicycle was locked to the rack with a master lock and cable and was valued at $450.5. Not in Wisconsin anymoreAccording to police reports, a 45-year-old woman from Fond Du Lac, Wis., was standing in line for a CTA bus in the 1100 block of South Michigan Avenue on Sept. 5, when an unknown man allegedly reached into her purse and stole her Motorola Razr phone, with an estimated value of $250. The thief then fled on foot.Complied by Chronicle staff with information provided by the Chicago Police Department.

VIDEO: Vice President Joe Biden delivers keynote address at the Richard J. Daley Urban Forum.

By Cristina Aguirre

May 4, 2009

Thirty international leaders along with Mayor Richard M. Daley and Vice President Joe Biden gathered on April 27 at the University of Illinois at Chicago to discuss the efforts their cities and countries are doing to successfully recover from the global economic crisis.For more information regarding the Richard J. Daley Urban Forum, visit  UIC.edu/orgs/daleyforum/...

In Other News

By The Columbia Chronicle

May 4, 2009

Hospital seeks to  expandAccording to the Southtown Star, Christ Medical Center officials are seeking state approval this fall to expand. The $200 million-plus expansion would include a parking garage and a new, eight-story building with more than 200 hospital beds, half of those being new. By the end of the expansion, the center would then have more than 800 beds, including a mix of adult surgical and pediatric beds and intensive care beds, among others. If approved by the state, the expansion is expected to be completed by 2012.Young workers worriedAccording to the Chicago Tribune, young suburban workers became concerned about evening work hours after a 17-year-old female was abducted and raped on Sept. 16. The young woman was working at T.J. Grinders sandwich store, 12250 S. Harlem Ave., when she noticed a "creepy" man watching her through the front store window at about 6:30 p.m., she told police. She then called a male friend to come pick her up. The offender then returned twice before he forced her into his black sedan, drove away, raped her in a remote area and then dumped her about a mile from her home. When the girl's friend arrived at the shop minutes after he was called he found her purse and a pack of cigarettes on the floor. The friend called authorities to report her missing. The incident has parents and community members questioning whether or not teenagers should work late hours.Former alderman dies at 90According to the Chicago Tribune, the first African-American woman elected to the Chicago City Council died Sept. 17 at the age of 90 after losing a battle to lung cancer. Anna Langford was elected as alderman of the 16th Ward in 1971, one of only two women on the council. Losing her re-election bid in 1975, Langford didn't return to the council until 1983, when she served two terms before retiring in 1991. Her son said his mother lived an active lifestyle up until her diagnosis.Lanford is survived by her son, Larry, three grandchildren and a great-grandchild.Idea lifting offOn Sept. 18, O'Hare International Airport announced its airlines may receive a helping hand from a Des Plaines-based company offering a towing service for planes to help conserve fuel and money. According to the Chicago Tribune, a Boeing 757 burns 12 times more jet fuel per minute than the cheaper diesel fuel burned per minute by the German-made push-tractor UST Aviation Services had purchased. United Airlines has already purchased six of the push-tractors while Northwest Airlines evaluates the idea. "The new service can reduce daily fuel burn by 90 percent," Mayank Tripathi, president of UST,  told the ChicagoTribune.

Group recognizes endangered landmarks

By mlekovic

May 4, 2009

The city of Chicago has an abundance of historical buildings, and some are reportedly in danger of being demolished because of deterioration, lack of maintenance and insufficient funds.Every year, Landmarks Illinois, the state’s leading voice for historic preservation, publishes a list of the top 10 historical places in Illinois that are in danger of being demolished.The list is published to show awareness and get attention...

Chicago blue over confirmed swine flu

By Bethany Reinhart

May 4, 2009

City and state officials have banded together and are taking all necessary precautions by keeping up with the latest information from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention to combat the onset of swine flu after the discovery of at least nine probable cases of the virus in Chicago. As of May 1, three cases have been confirmed.News of the outbreak in Chicago came as a North Side elementary school was shut down on April 29 afte...

VIDEO: Youth United for Darfur Rally

By Cristina Aguirre

April 27, 2009

Groups of young activists rallied at Federal Plaza, 50 W. Adams St., April 19 in hopes of drawing attention to the humanitarian crisis in Sudan. Youth United for Dafur, a coalition of 40 Chicago youth and student groups, aim to promote education and raise money for Sister Schools, a new program that supports education of Darfuri refugee students. The Chronicle talks to students about their support for Darfur and how they wan...

‘One Tree Makes a Difference’ this Arbor Week

By mlekovic

April 27, 2009

Chicago school children in all 50 wards were bound together by a unique ribbon project that honored trees on Arbor Day, April 24.More than 2,000 fourth graders wrote passages on green ribbons about why trees are important to them. They were hung on an elm tree proudly named Triumph, after President Barack Obama’s triumphant victory speech on Michigan Avenue, according to Gina Tedesco, spokeswoman for the Morton Arboretum, whic...

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