The Columbia Chronicle

College tightens budget, MPC project unfazed

By Timothy Bearden

October 20, 2008

In the midst of the national economic downturn, Columbia President Warrick L. Carter issued a memo regarding what will be done in order to reduce the college's spending.The memo was sent out to the Columbia community on Oct. 15 and said the college would implement a hiring freeze of full-time positions, consider replacement positions on a case-by-case basis, restrict foreign and domestic travel not already approved by the admini...

African dance performance makes a comeback

By Thomas Pardee

October 20, 2008

One of the largest and richest cultural programs in Columbia's history is set to return to Chicago next week under new management.The DuSable Museum is set to host DanceAfrica Chicago on Oct. 31 at the Harris Theater in Millennium Park, 205 E. Randolph St. The college produced DanceAfrica annually for 15 years before cutting the program in 2005, but is now the lead sponsor of DuSable's much smaller version of the event.During i...

 

Actress wants to break ethnic barriers

October 20, 2008

Elizabeth Peña's career has been quiet and potent. The ALMA Award-winning actress of stage and screen has starred in such memorable mainstream hits as Rush Hour and The Incredibles, but the characters that earn her the most respect are those ...

 

Columbia alumni launch ‘Moon Over Buffalo’

October 20, 2008

Breaking into Chicago’s theater scene is no easy task, but some Columbia alumni have found their way in. The opening season of the Saint Sebastian Players’ production of “Moon Over Buffalo” is led by Columbia cast ...

Critical Encounters: A toxic river runs through it

By Thomas Pardee

October 20, 2008

by Sandra AllenFaculty, Marketing Communication Department"When you thread the worm on the fish hook," my brother instructed, "grab it by its head and put the hook right there." He pointed to a greenish spot midway along the earthworm's body. "Then watch out for that black ooze that comes out of its end."  When I squirmed, he said, "Nothing wrong with the ooze; it's a little sticky, is all. Basically, it's what's left of ...

Columbia alumna blazes trail to Harpo Radio

By Eve Fuller

October 20, 2008

Juggling classes, homework and a job all with a cheerful smile helped Columbia graduate Katie Baker land a production assistant job at Oprah Winfrey's Harpo Radio in Chicago.After becoming Columbia's first student to earn an internship at Harpo Radio last year, Baker's supervisors said her professionalism and enthusiasm to learn paved the way for a dream job at the popular XM Satellite Radio station.Originally from Okemos, ...

 

Campus security aims for upgrade

October 20, 2008

Faculty are figuring out ways to give Columbia students easier access to classrooms. A plan proposed by Martha Meegan, director of Campus Safety and Security, aims to put key card readers on certain doors throughout Columbia’s cam...

Natural Tendencies: Critical Encounters’ personal narratives on Human/Nature

By The Columbia Chronicle

October 13, 2008

by Maggie KastFaculty, English DepartmentImagine an island 23 miles long and nine miles wide. Everything that doesn't come from the sea or the island's small patch of land must be hauled in by truck and ferry. You see long lines of refrigerated semi-trucks rumbling off the dock each morning, bringing supplies to a population that swells from 15,000 to 100,000 each summer. And there's no place for bottles and cans to go but into a landfill or back on the ferry.An early 17th century English sailor sees the island's profusion of wild grapevines and names it for his daughter, Martha. A few years later, English colonists claim the land from Wampanoag Indians. Two centuries later, it's a whaling center, bustling with Portuguese-speaking seamen from the Azores and Cape Verde Islands. A Methodist preacher arrives, holds a revival and camp tents become cottages surrounding a tabernacle. The early 20th century brings African American artists, politicians and educators, seasoning the mix of Puritan sheep farmers and fishermen with sun- and sea-loving summer people. Despite long, hard winters and crowded summers, everybody gets along.I joined those off-island visitors last July and rented a 100-year-old ramshackle beach cottage in the town of Oak Bluffs, Mass., big enough for all my children and step-children, their children, my sister and friends. Fifteen people gathered around a huge table for dinner each night. We hadn't all been together for 20 years; some had never even met each other's wives or children.The first day, three of us rode bikes along a gorgeous path between ocean sound and marshy nesting grounds, past banks of clover, goldenrod, cattails and beach plum. Near Edgartown, we stumbled upon a farm stand selling island-grown produce: lettuce, tomatoes, beans, zucchini, melons, basil and chives, food that had never seen a truck or a ferry. There were jars of beach plum jam and Portuguese sweet bread, not a confection but a faintly sweet and chewy loaf.We loaded up. That evening our vegetarians made Indian-style curried cauliflower and potatoes and soups of leek, potato and zucchini. My sister made tofu and chicken kebabs with Portuguese bread threaded between the vegetables, and my daughter made a three-bean salad. Our omnivores fired up the grill for beef as well as veggie burgers made of bulgur, beans and nuts."Those carbon deposits on grilled food cause cancer," said my oldest stepson, a physician."Your wife and kids avoid it too?" I asked."Only when I'm looking," he said as he boiled some steak in oil, then finished it in the microwave.People flowed like breezes around the unlocked house, sitting on the porch, forming groups for talks or walks or rides, getting to know the strangers who shared their genes. Everybody got along."What happened to my washcloth?" called my sister from upstairs one morning. The washing machine rumbled, and everyone shrugged, sleepy over coffee in the kitchen."The towels are gone too," said my daughter, getting up."Some people hang their towels to dry," said the doctor's wife. "We use them once and throw them on the floor."Eyebrows rose, and we nodded comprehension. It seems the doc had swept the house of towels and put them in to wash. Our dissonant family cultures clashed and blended, while the moist, salt breezes, broad sounds and shell-filled beaches softened the edges of our difference. The women swam and read, teens hung out in town and the men played timed chess.Each evening we gathered to drink beer or wine and cook. Day by day the clinking pile of bottles grew. Each time someone left, they took a bagful to the ferry, imagining an island that would never be used up.

 

Upstairs exhibit a boost for photo rookies

October 13, 2008

While most exhibits on campus display work created by upperclassmen, the Photography Department is tipping its hat to the up-and-comers as well. The hallways on the 10th floor of the Alexandroff Campus Center, 600 S. Michiga...

TV Time

 

By The Columbia Chronicle

October 13, 2008

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL ESPN 10/20 at 7:30 p.m. Keep your eyes glued to the screen as Denver takes on New England in the Patriots' first home game since Miami in week three. Usually a game like this wouldn't be recommended, but the Broncos ...

 

Ready, set…sell

October 13, 2008

Columbia's latest effort to showcase student work is set to launch this week in the form of an on-campus store, which will be open to the public and serve to earn both the college and artists some extra cash. ShopColumbia, ...

Kerouac’s beat goes on at Columbia

By Kaiti Deerberg

October 13, 2008

Jack Kerouac's original On the Road manuscript has made its latest stop at Columbia and inspired staff and students to celebrate the Beats' legacy.The famous manuscript was written by Kerouac on a 120-foot scroll during a three-week period in 1951. Kerouac was an original member of the group of artists known as "The Beats," including Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs and Neal Cassady, who explored alternative writing styles ...

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