The Columbia Chronicle

Artist & Craftsman Supply closed its doors this month, leaving the Columbia community in search of a new art supplies store.

Columbia students say goodbye to beloved art supply shop in the South Loop: ‘It felt like our store’

July 31, 2020

Whether it be for sketchbooks, tools or stationery, Artist and Craftsman Supply was the go-to shop for Columbia students and instructors. Emily Gibson, a 2018 illustration alumna, said the stor...

Strategic Plan advertisements

Recent program eliminations spark mistrust in Strategic Plan, administration

April 13, 2015

Following the March 23 unveiling of the Strategic Plan draft during Spring Break, posters encouraging the college community to “continue the conversation” by sharing its feedback online at the college...

The block of Wabash Avenue between Madison and Washington streets will be closed for next 18 months due to the construction of the new Wabash and Washington stop.

Chicago Loop Alliance transforms Wabash Avenue into Magnificent Mile

March 30, 2015

From Wacker Drive to Congress Parkway, the Chicago Loop Alliance is spearheading a new infrastructure project, “Layers of Transformation,” to transform Wabash Avenue into a premier Chicago tourist dest...

The Student Veteran Society and the Student Programming Board hosted “Together We Remember,” an open-mic event in the Papermaker’s Garden, 754 S. Wabash Ave., that invited the college’s veterans to commemorate the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Few students turn out for 9/11 commemoration

September 15, 2014

“Never Forget,” a term often used when discussing the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, that claimed the lives of more than 3,000 people and led to years of military engagement in Iraq and Afgha...

FDA tissue ban outdated, discriminatory

By Editorial Board

September 2, 2014

An Iowa woman is calling for the Food and Drug Administration to lift its ban on tissue donations from men who have sex with other men (MSM) after her deceased 16-year-old son’s eye and skin donations were denied because he identified as gay and she was unable to answer questions about his sexual history, according to an Aug. 12 Des Moines Register report.The FDA’s ban is a remnant of the 1980s AIDS crisis when little else was known about the disease other than its high incidence and fatality rates among sexually active gay men. Since then, stigmas attached to gayness have lessened and the advent of better HIV detection methods and treatments have rendered the FDA’s policy more bigoted than fact-based. The ban unjustly prevents gay men from making tissue donations and endangers the lives of individuals on donation lists awaiting imperative transplants.While gay and bisexual men accounted for 63 percent of new HIV infections in 2010, the remaining 37 percent can be attributed to other groups, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The FDA’s ban appears to be based on an outdated stereotype that only gay men can contract HIV. Because the FDA did not know the teen’s sexual history, it was assumed his identity as a gay man meant he was sexually active and therefore too great of a risk. This is an unfair assumption that the FDA applies to all gay men and MSMs.The ban seems even less logical considering that organ donations of gay men are accepted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which is why the gay teen’s organs were transplanted but not the tissues. The U.S. HHS oversees the donation of organs such as the heart, kidneys and pancreas, according to its website. While organs are considered a life-saving donation and tissues considered a life-enhancing donation, according to the department’s website, all donations should be thoroughly screened for diseases and rejections should be based on medical grounds. It is the FDA’s policy to test all organ and tissue donations, according to the CDC’s website.Criticism of the FDA’s policy surrounding gay individuals shows the medical establishment is moving past the stereotype of HIV being a gay disease, as in 2013 when the American Medical Association voiced disapproval of the FDA’s lifetime ban on gay men donating blood.One tissue donor can enhance the lives of 50 people, according to the U.S. HHS’s website. Banning gay men from donating tissue negatively affects potential tissue recipients and hinders their quality of life.The FDA should consider the changing views of society and adopt a more socially tolerant attitude like other health authorities. It would prevent the FDA from treating gay people as second-class citizens and would provide those who need donations with more choices.

Youngblood Hawke, an indie band from Los Angeles, will help headline the main stage at Manifest.

Manifest headliners soar to main stage

March 31, 2014

Electronic beats and indie-pop will echo throughout the South Loop at this year’s Manifest, Columbia’s annual urban arts festival,  when Chicago-based mashup duo The Hood Internet and Los An...

Driving human emotions

Driving human emotions

February 17, 2014

Driving can be a very stressful activity, especially in Chicago. But what if cars could detect a driver’s emotional state and possibly prevent an accident?This is the goal for a team of researchers from th...

Chance the Rapper

Chance the Rapper channels Chicago hip-hop

May 13, 2013

CHANCE THE RAPPER took the hip-hop blogosphere by storm on May 7 when he released his sophomore mixtape “Acid Rap,” a matured version of his cartoonish style with classic soul production that includ...

Hilton partnership furthers Wabash Arts Corridor

By Tyler Eagle

January 28, 2013

Columbia and Hilton Chicago, 720 S. Michigan Ave., have partnered to display student art on the back of the hotel.The partnership is part of the Wabash Arts Corridor project, an initiative dedicated to transforming the seven blocks worth of buildings on South Wabash Avenue, between Congress Parkway and Roosevelt Road, into a gallery of student work, according to Mark Kelly, vice president of Student Affairs.Kelly said he select...

Manifest 2012 ‘pedal-powered’

By Heather Scroering

April 9, 2012

In a few weeks, the main topic of conversation is likely to shift from prioritization, with its many listening forums and layers of recommendations, to the college’s largest and most attractive event of the year, Manifest.This year’s celebration, pushed forward one week to May 4 because of the NATO summit, will see more than 75 showcases, a pedal-powered amusement park and countless other exhibitions featuring the work ...

Signs for change?

By Aviva Einhorn

January 23, 2012

Homeless people in downtown Chicago are turning in their homemade signs for a less traditional badge as they begin to hold white, laminated pieces of computer paper reading “Homeless” or “Please help.”The Homeless Signs project is responsible for the circulation of these new labels. Created by Christopher Devine and David Rauen, the project aims to help panhandlers to better solicit the attention of passersby, but so...

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