The Columbia Chronicle

State department to probe visa seekers’ social media

State department to probe  visa seekers’ social media

By Blaise Mesa

April 9, 2018

International visitors who are seeking to reside in the U.S. but not immediately immigrate may soon have to turn over huge amounts of personal information, including social media handles, old phone numbe...

Opening Day exiled to Wrigley Field

Opening Day exiled to Wrigley Field

April 6, 2015

It’s hard enough to catch a home run ball, and it’s even harder to catch one in the middle of a construction zone.It’s too bad this is the inconvenient truth that is the Chicago Cubs—one disappo...

Block Party 2015 Welcomes New Students to Campus | The Columbia Chronicle

February 2, 2015

Mark Kelly welcomed new students to Columbia with a “Hell Yeah!”He yelled the nine commandments to students to encourage their success and they replied “Hell Yeah!” to each one.There was food, live pe...

CPD warns South Loop residents of violent assaults

By Metro Editor

February 2, 2015

Police are warning South Loop residents of an unknown male offender or offenders whom they say violently assaulted and robbed four women between Jan. 13–27.In each case, the women were approached from behind, pushed or punched in the face and knocked  to the ground,  after which their purses and cellphones were forcibly taken, according to a community alert issued by detectives on Jan. 28.Detectives are looking for a suspect betwee...

College experiences administrative shake-up

College experiences administrative shake-up

By Campus Editor

January 26, 2015

The college experienced a stream of employment changes at the administrative level while students and staff were away from campus during winter break.Susan Marcus, associate vice president of Academic ...

Cooking robot may offer artificial culinary intelligence

By Sports & Health Editor

January 26, 2015

One of the greatest questions in developing of artificial intelligence is how to provide robots with a software template that enables them to recognize objects and learn actions by watching humans. Researchers from the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and the National Information Communications Technology Research Centre of Excellence in Australia have developed a software system that allows robots to learn actions and make inferences by watching cooking videos from YouTube.“It’s very difficult [to teach robots] actions where something is manipulated because there’s a lot of variation in the way the action happens,” said co-author Cornelia Fermüller, a research scientist at the University of Maryland’s Institute for Advanced Computer Studies. “If I do it or someone else does it, we do it very differently. We could use different tools so you have to find a way of capturing this variation. ”The intelligent system that enabled the robot to glean information from the videos includes two artificial neural networks that mimic the human eye’s processing resulting in object recognition, according to the study. The networks enabled the robot to recognize objects it viewed in the videos and determine the type of grasp required to manipulate objects such as knives and tomatoes when chopping, dicing and preparing food. “In addition to [accounting for variation] there is the difficulty involved in capturing it visually,” Fermüller said. “We’ve looked at the goal of the task and then decomposed it on the basis of that.”Fermüller said the group classified the two types of grasping the robot performed as “power” versus “precision.” Broadly, power grasping is used when an object needs to be held firmly in order to apply force—like when holding a knife to make a cut. Holding a tomato in place to stabilize it is considered precision grasping—a more fine-grain action that calls for accuracy, according to the paper. When observing human activity in real life, robotic systems are able to perceive the movements and objects they are designed to recognize in three dimensions over time, Fermüller said. However, when the movement and objects are viewed in a video, that information is not as immediately understood. “The way we think of videos is as a three-dimensional entity in the sense that there are two dimensions of space and one dimension of time,” said Jason Corso, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. “It’s not as 3D as the world we live in, but one can use a video … which is a spacetime signal, and from it correspond feature points that could be used to reconstruct the 3D environment that is being seen or imaged in that video.”According to the paper, the development of deep neural networks that are able to efficiently capture raw data from video and enable robots to perceive actions and objects have revolutionized how visual recognition in artificially intelligent systems function. The algorithms programmed into the University of Maryland’s cooking robot are one example of this neural functioning.“So what was used here was really the hand description and object tool description, and then the action was inferred out of that,” Fermüller said. Previous research on robotic manipulation and action recognition has been conducted using hand trackers and motion capture gloves to overcome the inherent limitations of trying to design artificial intelligence that can learn by example, she said. “Part of the problem is that robot hands today are so behind what biological manipulation is capable of,” said Ken Forbus, a professor of computer science and education at Northwestern University. “We have more dynamic range in terms of our touch sensing. It’s very, very difficult to calibrate, as there’s all sorts of problems that might be real problems and any system is going to have to solve them.”Forbus said some of the difficulty that presents itself in robotic design arises from the fact that the tools robots are outfitted with are far behind the ones humans are born with both physically and in terms of sense perception.“There is tons of tacit knowledge in human understanding—tons,” Forbus said. “Not just in manipulation, [but] in conceptual knowledge.”According to Forbus, artificial intelligence researchers have three ways to incorporate this type of conceptual thinking into intelligent systems. The first option is to try to design robots that can think and analyze in a manner superior to humans, and the second is articulating the tacit knowledge that humans possess by trying to boil it down into a programmable set of rules. The third way is to attempt to model the AI on the type of analogical thinking humans use as they discern information and make generalizations that help provide a framework for how to act during future experiences. “That’s a model that’s daunting in the sense that it requires lots and lots of [programmed] experience,” Forbus said. “But it’s promising in that if we can make analogical generalization work in scale … it’s going to be a very human-like way of doing it.”

Ferguson decision too little too late

By Editorial Board

December 8, 2014

After a grand jury’s Nov. 24 decision not to indict Ferguson Police Department Officer Darren Wilson on charges stemming from the death of unarmed black teen Michael Brown, conversations about police brutality and racial profiling erupted nationwide.Ferguson Mayor James Knowles attempted to appease protesters and other disgruntled citizens at a Nov. 30 press conference by announcing that an independent civilian review board w...

Fracking rules need revision

By Editorial Board

November 24, 2014

Despite years of vigorous protest from environmentalists, energy companies will soon be able to drill for oil and gas in the state as a result of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources publishing its final regulations on hydraulic fracturing Nov. 14.Hydraulic fracturing, aka fracking, is the highly controversial process of extracting natural oil and gas from the ground by breaking down rocks through drilling and injec...

One World Trade Center memorializes 9/11

By Editorial Board

November 10, 2014

Thirteen years after the 9/11 terrorist attacks destroyed the World Trade Center, the One World Trade Center opened Nov. 3.The building respectfully pays tribute to the 2,977 people who died on 9/11 while keeping pace with Lower Manhattan’s thriving economic development.Standing at 1,776 feet, symbolic of the year the U.S. declared independence, the One World Trade Center is the tallest and most expensive building in th...

Media spread Ebola hysteria

By Editorial Board

October 13, 2014

Dominating headlines and spurring 24-hour coverage on news channels, the Ebola virus is infecting the minds of Americans despite assurances from White House officials that the illness will not spread to the U.S.As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue their efforts to mitigate a potential U.S. outbreak, media outlets are reporting developments with undue urgency even though the first Ebola death on U.S. ...

Pediatric medicine’s damaging oversight

Pediatric medicine’s damaging oversight

October 13, 2014

In 1889, pediatric surgeon William Hill was removing the tonsils from children with obstructed airways to alleviate their struggles with breathing when he noticed unforeseen side effects of the procedure. T...

Increased bacon sales amplify health concerns

Increased bacon sales amplify health concerns

February 24, 2014

The boom of bacon sales in the U.S. may benefit the meat industry but could be bad for the nation’s health.Bacon sales among top meat vendors reached nearly $4 billion last year, a 9.5 percent increase from th...

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