The Columbia Chronicle

US cannot be casual about increasing airstrike casualties

US cannot be casual about increasing airstrike casualties

By Arabella Breck

April 3, 2017

As many as 200 civilians have been killed in airstrikes in Mosul, Iraq, in recent weeks, including a strike March 17 that may have killed more than 100 people. These could be some of the highest death to...

Student’s big idea creates Big Ideas Columbia

Senior public relations major Kathryn Walters, along with the Office of Student Communications, organized Big Ideas Columbia, an event for students to learn what it means to be successful during and after college.

By Senior Campus Reporter

February 23, 2015

The office of Student Communications is teaming up with senior public relations major Kathryn Walters to produce Big Ideas Columbia. Big Ideas Columbia will be held Feb. 26 from 4–6 p.m. at Film Row ...

'One century minus a baker's dozen:' Finding the forest for the trees in the translation of literature

‘One century minus a baker’s dozen:’ Finding the forest for the trees in the translation of literature

November 17, 2014

“Fourscore and seven years ago” is a phrase every American knows. Abraham Lincoln began his Gettysburg Address to a war-weary crowd of Pennsylvanians with those five words on a Thursday afternoon in Novembe...

Season Affective Disorder

SAD or just sick of winter?

February 24, 2014

The unpredictable weather has left Chicagoans with many complaints, but winter has also made people susceptible to the winter blues, known in the medical community as seasonal affective disorder.SAD is...

Who’s your radical?

By Alexandra Kukulka

February 13, 2012

by Ernie LoveAdjunct Faculty, First–Year Seminar“Death of a Salesman” (1949),  “An Enemy of the People” (1950) and “The Crucible” (1952) is a radical body of literary work reflecting Arthur Miller’s attempts to enlighten the consciousness of Americans in the post–World War II era: to be advised that the promise of freedom and prosperity in a communist-free America is rife with “multiple truths.”  He was, in fact, challenging America’s self-awareness.Miller’s 1950 adaptation of Henrik Ibsen’s play, “An Enemy of the People,” illustrates such themes as tyranny of the majority and shows how leaders can manipulate the masses. Miller’s decision to adapt Ibsen’s play is explained in his autobiography, “Timebends.” Specifically, Miller  confronted censorship of what were considered “un-American” plays at the time because of the “Red Scare” promulgated by Senator Joseph McCarthy. Miller expressed the following thoughts during the process of adapting Ibsen’s play in his autobiography:“I aspired to a rather exalted image of the dramatist as a species of truth-revealing leader whose brandished light would blind the monster chaos in his approach. Dramaturgy was the physics of the arts, the one that failed when it lied and succeeded when it cut to the first principles of human life.”For me, “Death of a Salesman” and “The Crucible” are his most prominent works because they popped up more than once in high school and college as core texts. These two works provided insight for reflecting on my experience in family relationships, personal growth and maturity, as well as a perspective on American culture and society.“The Crucible,”  is an allegory of McCarthyism I first encountered as a high school student in 1968. It was particularly influential in raising my awareness of the delicate balance that exists in the power structure of a democracy, as well as the role of a citizen in a democratic republic.Note that in 1956 and 1957, Miller was subpoenaed by the House Un-American Activities Committee and was convicted of contempt of Congress for his refusal to identify writers believed to hold Communist sympathies.The impact of “Death of a Salesman” did not register with me until my mid-20s. When it did, Miller’s critique of the American Dream made sense as I reflected on my friends, my family and the stories we could tell about our own successes and failures on life’s journey, particularly as these stories varied with respect to attainment of wealth, lifestyle comforts and a sense of self-worth.Miller was the first American writer to be elected president of PEN International. Miller was also posthumously honored by PEN in 2006 with the establishment of the annual Arthur Miller Freedom to Write Lecture.  From PEN’s charter:“PEN stands for the principle of unhampered transmission of thought within each nation and between all nations, and members pledge themselves to oppose any form of suppression of freedom of expression in the country and community to which they belong, as well as throughout the world wherever this is possible.”It is fitting for Miller, whose activism took on varied forms throughout his life, to receive this honor.

Aram Saroyan visits, ‘Four Monologues’ bring unity

By Lisa Schulz

January 30, 2012

Despite the gloom of Russian poets’ thoughts during the Stalinist era, visiting artist Aram Saroyan could be seen smiling amid the audience as Columbia theater students rehearsed for his play’s first theatrical performance.On Jan. 25, Columbia students performed “Four Monologues,” a play based on the lives of four Russian poets, at the Poetry Foundation, 61 W. Superior St. Saroyan, a poet, novelist, playwright and bi...

Sustainability remains priority for Columbia

By Samuel Charles

October 18, 2010

On Oct. 14 Columbia hosted the Chicago GreenTown Conference, which aims to raise awareness about environmental responsibility, at the 1104 Center, 1104 S. Wabash Ave. The conference was aimed at city planners and civic audiences to promote sustainability, primarily focusing on transportation, community design and green neighborhoods.The keynote speakers at the conference were Phillipe Cousteau, activist and chief ocean corresponden...

Russian passenger airliner makes safe landing in Moscow after concerns of gear damage

By By Wikinews

October 26, 2009

A Russian passenger airliner safely landed at the Vnukovo airport in Moscow on Saturday, after concerns that its landing gear might have been damaged.The plane, an Airbus A330 with 267 passengers aboard, had departed from Vladivostok, en route to Moscow. Shortly after takeoff, pieces of landing gear were discovered on the runway, which were "most likely from that particular airplane," according to an Emergency Ministry spoke...

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