The Columbia Chronicle

First of its kind: Quidditch scholarship will aim to bring diversity to the sport

First of its kind: Quidditch scholarship will aim to bring diversity to the sport

October 6, 2020

Rylie Smedley discovered quidditch—the real version of sport featured in the “Harry Potter” series—her freshman year at Columbia when she was looking to try something new. Now a senior, the cin...

The world needs to move on from ‘Harry Potter’

DirecTV says it wants Taylor Swift 'NOW'

By Managing Editor

October 10, 2016

The final trailer for "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" came out Sept. 28, and the newest addition to the "Harry Potter" franchise finally has a bit of a followable plot. And, it completely pan...

Natalie Y. Moore debuts her newest book | The Columbia Chronicle

April 4, 2016

WBEZ reporter Natalie Y. Moore hosted a book reading and discussion of her latest book, “The South Side: A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation,” March 20 at Columbia’s 33 E. Congress Parkway B...

2015 Chicago Auto Show

Chicago Auto Show sets stage for future of automobiles

February 16, 2015

From hands-free assistance to Bluetooth capabilities, new technological innovations have infiltrated the automotive world for the past decade. This year, the Chicago Auto Show is home to many displays of these t...

Novel brain

New reading comprehension model scans between lines

December 8, 2014

Reading and language comprehension are more complicated than scientists once thought.Understanding words spoken or read on a page has historically been linked to two places in the left hemisphere of the brain—Broca’s...

Featured Athlete: Connor McCluskey

Featured Athlete: Connor McCluskey

October 20, 2014

Connor McCluskey, a sophomore audio arts & acoustics major, is captain of the college’s Quidditch team. Quidditch, an invented sport featured in J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” series, has begun to...

Season Affective Disorder

SAD or just sick of winter?

February 24, 2014

The unpredictable weather has left Chicagoans with many complaints, but winter has also made people susceptible to the winter blues, known in the medical community as seasonal affective disorder.SAD is...

Who’s your radical?

By Alexandra Kukulka

February 13, 2012

by Ernie LoveAdjunct Faculty, First–Year Seminar“Death of a Salesman” (1949),  “An Enemy of the People” (1950) and “The Crucible” (1952) is a radical body of literary work reflecting Arthur Miller’s attempts to enlighten the consciousness of Americans in the post–World War II era: to be advised that the promise of freedom and prosperity in a communist-free America is rife with “multiple truths.”  He was, in fact, challenging America’s self-awareness.Miller’s 1950 adaptation of Henrik Ibsen’s play, “An Enemy of the People,” illustrates such themes as tyranny of the majority and shows how leaders can manipulate the masses. Miller’s decision to adapt Ibsen’s play is explained in his autobiography, “Timebends.” Specifically, Miller  confronted censorship of what were considered “un-American” plays at the time because of the “Red Scare” promulgated by Senator Joseph McCarthy. Miller expressed the following thoughts during the process of adapting Ibsen’s play in his autobiography:“I aspired to a rather exalted image of the dramatist as a species of truth-revealing leader whose brandished light would blind the monster chaos in his approach. Dramaturgy was the physics of the arts, the one that failed when it lied and succeeded when it cut to the first principles of human life.”For me, “Death of a Salesman” and “The Crucible” are his most prominent works because they popped up more than once in high school and college as core texts. These two works provided insight for reflecting on my experience in family relationships, personal growth and maturity, as well as a perspective on American culture and society.“The Crucible,”  is an allegory of McCarthyism I first encountered as a high school student in 1968. It was particularly influential in raising my awareness of the delicate balance that exists in the power structure of a democracy, as well as the role of a citizen in a democratic republic.Note that in 1956 and 1957, Miller was subpoenaed by the House Un-American Activities Committee and was convicted of contempt of Congress for his refusal to identify writers believed to hold Communist sympathies.The impact of “Death of a Salesman” did not register with me until my mid-20s. When it did, Miller’s critique of the American Dream made sense as I reflected on my friends, my family and the stories we could tell about our own successes and failures on life’s journey, particularly as these stories varied with respect to attainment of wealth, lifestyle comforts and a sense of self-worth.Miller was the first American writer to be elected president of PEN International. Miller was also posthumously honored by PEN in 2006 with the establishment of the annual Arthur Miller Freedom to Write Lecture.  From PEN’s charter:“PEN stands for the principle of unhampered transmission of thought within each nation and between all nations, and members pledge themselves to oppose any form of suppression of freedom of expression in the country and community to which they belong, as well as throughout the world wherever this is possible.”It is fitting for Miller, whose activism took on varied forms throughout his life, to receive this honor.

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