The Columbia Chronicle

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'No bees, no food': Chicagoans are abuzz about saving bees

‘No bees, no food’: Chicagoans are abuzz about saving bees

August 13, 2019

The honey bee population is being killed off at an unsustainable rate, with beekeepers reporting a 30% loss in their colonies annually. Activist organizations in the Chicagoland area are trying to c...

Israeli elections demonstrate democracy despite final outcomes

By Sports & Health Reporter

March 30, 2015

Israelis visited the polls on March 17 to exercise their right to vote as citizens of the only true democracy in the Middle East. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the leader of Israel’s right-wing Likud Party, was elected for a fourth term as prime minister, much to the dismay of progressive Israelis and Jews worldwide, though the left-leaning Zionist Union and its leader Isaac Herzog—Netanyahu’s main opposition—...

Insect diet offers squirming sustainability

Camren Brantley-Rios, a senior at Auburn University, has challenged himself to incorporate insects into his meals three times a day for 30 days. 

By Sports & Health Reporter

February 16, 2015

From juicing to gluten-free labels, the health world has played host to its fair share of hype in recent years. However, one Auburn University senior is pioneering a new health-based challenge: Camren ...

Kara Vana, a sophomore public relations major, said gaining experience in diverse fields is an important part of the college experience. To achieve this, Vana became a college representative for Headbands for Hope, an organization that gives headbands to children with cancer and donates money to fund research.

Someone You Should Know: Student stays busy by giving back

November 10, 2014

Kara Vana, a sophomore public relations major, is bringing Headbands of Hope, a nonprofit that raises funds for children’s cancer research, to Columbia. For every standard headband sold for $14.95, the company donates $1 to the cause and gives a headband to a girl battling the di...

Tactile fluidity: Human sense of wetness likely a collaboration of receptors

Tactile fluidity: Human perception of wetness likely a collaboration of receptors

By Assistant Sports & Health Editor & Copy Chief

October 13, 2014

A diver stands poised at the edge of a dock. With one smooth motion, he leaps outward and parts the surface of the water with his hands. Immediately, his skin prickles at the ocean’s coolness. The palm...

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