The Columbia Chronicle

Safety first: know your toy's story

Safety first: Should government regulate sex toys?

February 9, 2016

The world of sex toys can be big and scary to a novice—it’s easy to grab the cheapest vibrator available and think it will suffice. However, not knowing the origin and composition of the sex toys yo...

Shannelle Armstrong-Fowler

Notable Native: Shannelle Armstrong-Fowler

May 4, 2015

From working in public office to creating a dress made completely out of McDonald’s gift cards, Shannelle Armstrong-Fowler has done it all. During her 15-year career in the public relations field, she worked for...

Alderman Edward Burke (14th Ward) is seeking to ban the sale of Palcohol, powdered alcohol, in Chicago this summer with an ordinance he proposed May 18. 

Palcohol may be available for sale in Chicago this summer

April 6, 2015

While powdered alcohol could conceivably be sold in Chicago this summer, legislators, mirroring the concerns of health professionals, are working to keep this from happening. The state legislature is con...

SGA

SGA to hold first meeting of semester

February 2, 2015

Having spent much of the Fall 2014 semester forging a relationship with the college community, the Student Government Association is reconvening Feb. 3 for its first senate meeting of the new semester. L...

The online documentary film series “The School Project” explores the issues faced in public school systems nationwide.

Web series addresses Chicago Public School closings

February 2, 2015

in 2013, Chicago Public Schools announced that 49 elementary schools would be shut down due to budget cuts.When the news broke, five film production companies began what is now known as “The School Project,...

Antibiotic Discoveries

Researchers unearth new bacteria-resistant antibiotic

January 26, 2015

Scientists have searched for ways to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria for nearly 30 years, but it turns out the answer may have been under their feet the entire time. Researchers from Northeastern ...

Graphic cigarette warning labels reduce smoking rates

Cigarettes

By Assistant Sports & Health Editor

November 24, 2014

In an effort to reduce cigarette consumption, Canada became the first country to mandate graphic warning labels depicting the negative effects of smoking on cigarette packaging in 2001. Since then, the co...

tDCS

DIY devices jolt brain, improve function

November 17, 2014

For some, a cup of coffee is the best way to focus on work. But for Vincent Wood, a junior neuroscience major at the University of Pittsburgh, that extra jolt of energy comes from a different source.Wood use...

Colleges could improve counseling

By Editorial Board

November 10, 2014

As the number of young adults enrolling in higher education continues to rise, the need for colleges to provide adequate services for students with mental illness has increased.Like most institutions, Columbia offers various forms of counseling to its students. The office of Counseling Services provides them with a maximum of 10 free individual sessions per academic year and an unlimited number of group therapy sessions. Al...

Courtesy of Associated Press

American Heart Association advocates for e-cigarette regulation

September 8, 2014

The American Heart Association released its first policy on e-cigarettes Aug. 24, stating that e-cigarettes threaten to “addict the next generation of smokers.” The AHA said it based its position on the limi...

FDA tissue ban outdated, discriminatory

By Editorial Board

September 2, 2014

An Iowa woman is calling for the Food and Drug Administration to lift its ban on tissue donations from men who have sex with other men (MSM) after her deceased 16-year-old son’s eye and skin donations were denied because he identified as gay and she was unable to answer questions about his sexual history, according to an Aug. 12 Des Moines Register report.The FDA’s ban is a remnant of the 1980s AIDS crisis when little else was known about the disease other than its high incidence and fatality rates among sexually active gay men. Since then, stigmas attached to gayness have lessened and the advent of better HIV detection methods and treatments have rendered the FDA’s policy more bigoted than fact-based. The ban unjustly prevents gay men from making tissue donations and endangers the lives of individuals on donation lists awaiting imperative transplants.While gay and bisexual men accounted for 63 percent of new HIV infections in 2010, the remaining 37 percent can be attributed to other groups, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The FDA’s ban appears to be based on an outdated stereotype that only gay men can contract HIV. Because the FDA did not know the teen’s sexual history, it was assumed his identity as a gay man meant he was sexually active and therefore too great of a risk. This is an unfair assumption that the FDA applies to all gay men and MSMs.The ban seems even less logical considering that organ donations of gay men are accepted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which is why the gay teen’s organs were transplanted but not the tissues. The U.S. HHS oversees the donation of organs such as the heart, kidneys and pancreas, according to its website. While organs are considered a life-saving donation and tissues considered a life-enhancing donation, according to the department’s website, all donations should be thoroughly screened for diseases and rejections should be based on medical grounds. It is the FDA’s policy to test all organ and tissue donations, according to the CDC’s website.Criticism of the FDA’s policy surrounding gay individuals shows the medical establishment is moving past the stereotype of HIV being a gay disease, as in 2013 when the American Medical Association voiced disapproval of the FDA’s lifetime ban on gay men donating blood.One tissue donor can enhance the lives of 50 people, according to the U.S. HHS’s website. Banning gay men from donating tissue negatively affects potential tissue recipients and hinders their quality of life.The FDA should consider the changing views of society and adopt a more socially tolerant attitude like other health authorities. It would prevent the FDA from treating gay people as second-class citizens and would provide those who need donations with more choices.

Off the leash: Chicago’s unregistered dogs

By Assistant Metro Editor

January 27, 2014

Although the majority of Chicago pet owners have dogs, most do not register their canines, which is a growing problem city officials are working to address.Chicago Municipal Code requires all dogs four months and older to be registered, but the number of dog licenses issued accounts for only 6 percent of the city’s 600,00-plus dogs, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association.The majority of dog owners do not...

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