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Colleges must provide food for thought

March 17, 2014

One of the popular stereotypes of college students is that they are starving, but it turns out that many actually do go hungry, giving the cliché a serious edge.A study conducted at Western Oregon University and published Jan. 9 in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that 59 percent of the university’s students struggled with limited access to food at some point in 2013. When students are unsure of where t...

City puts breaks on ride-share companies

By Metro Editor

February 17, 2014

Ride-share companies, such as Uber and Lyft, are facing roadblocks because of regulations pro- posed by the mayor and a lawsuit filed by major cab companies. Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Alderman Emma Mitts (37th Ward) introduced a draft ordinance to City Council Feb. 5 to standardize the currently unregulated ride-share companies. If the ordinance passes, ride-share companies would be required to pay an annual fee of $25,0...

Skatalites continue to jam

By Alex Stedman

October 22, 2012

Band breakups are all too common, but some bands stay active for decades.Since its formation in 1964, Jamaican ska band The Skatalites has released 15 studio albums and had a number of lineup changes after a few band members died.The current members—Lester Sterling, alto saxophone; Doreen Shaffer, vocals; Azemobo Audu, tenor saxophone; Andrae Murchison, trombone; Kevin Batchelor, trumpet; Val Douglas, bass guitar; Natty ...

Campus untouched by NATO protests

By Sophia Coleman

May 22, 2012

Columbia’s campus came through unscathed, despite being caught in the middle of the NATO protests that unfolded between May 18 and May 21 and witnessed a clash between a few thousand demonstrators and police officers.No damage was done to the school’s property, according to Bob Koverman, vice president of Campus Safety and Security. He said the campus had prepared for the event by closing two weeks early and had a sol...

Administration Frustration

By Alexandra Kukulka

April 23, 2012

A witness has alleged that she heard a top college official announce that he would like to “beat the s--t out of that girl” after a fractious confrontation in his office with a student seeking to get the college to install a green roof atop the Media Production Center, 1600 S. State St.Sophomore marketing communication major Toni Andreina said she was meeting with John Kavouris, associate vice president of Facilities &a...

Faculty strives for, hides transparency

By Lisa Schulz

March 19, 2012

The Faculty Senate boasted of its transparent discussions with Columbia's administration in its March 16 meeting, than a short time later declared a closed-door session to discuss the provost search.Prior to closing the meeting, the Senate’s discussion touched on newly presented financial models, reallocation of funds and search dates for a chief financial officer and provost. It also approved three new proposed majors in t...

America’s biggest problem: itself

By Matt Watson

November 28, 2011

In an unsurprising act, Congress’ Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction failed to meet its Nov. 21 deadline for drafting a plan to shave more than $1.2 trillion off the federal deficit in the next decade. The committee had months of time to deliberate and the specter of more than $1 trillion in random cuts to defense and non-defense spending hanging over its head as motivation. These politicians had the opportunity to sa...

Negotiations with P-Fac make progress

By Lisa Schulz

September 19, 2011

Columbia’s part-time faculty union, P-Fac, and representatives of the administration have been negotiating a new contract since March 2010 and are streamlining their teams so that only two members are representing each side to simplify the decision-making process.“Progress is being made in the negotiations,” said Louise Love, interim provost and vice president of academic affairs, who became part of the college’s large...

Columbia staff cuts ‘needed’

By Samuel Charles

March 7, 2011

The unforgiving economic climate has forced many businesses and organizations to shrink their staff in order to remain efficient and profitable. Columbia showed its susceptibility to market change on Feb. 28 when it announced there would be immediate cuts to the school’s 2,800-person staff.Twenty-three people were relieved of their positions. The announcement came in an e-mail to college employees from Vice President of ...

Pay increase leaves some behind

By Drew Hunt

October 25, 2010

Amid ongoing salary negotiations between Columbia’s administration and the part-time faculty and staff unions, President Warrick L. Carter announced a 1 percent pay increase for all full-time faculty and non-union staff effective Nov. 15. Full-time faculty and non-union staff will also receive a one-time bonus of 1 percent on Dec. 15.Members of the United Staff of Columbia College, the union representing a majority of college staff, as ...

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