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Students start grassroots effort to provide a student newspaper to UIC

Students start grassroots effort to provide a student newspaper to UIC

November 10, 2019

Last semester when student workers went on strike at the University of Illinois at Chicago, no one on campus knew what was really going on amid conflicting reports. The misinformation highlighted the need for an independent, stude...

Jeff Sessions’ visit to Northwestern sparks protests, political clash on campus

Jeff Sessions’ visit to Northwestern sparks protests, political clash on campus

November 6, 2019

From the inside of Northwestern University’s Lutkin Hall, the sounds of banging on walls, high-pitched screaming and angry, guttural chants drowned out much of former Attorney General Jeff Session...

Professors talk ‘What Comes Next?’ in ‘Hamilton’s’ impact

Professors talk ‘What Comes Next?’ in ‘Hamilton’s’ impact

February 27, 2017

Gold Coast’s Newberry Library was bustling with a full crowd of all ages—some even arriving after the panel started—eager to hear a discussion about the hit musical “Hamilton’s” classroom i...

Drug intervention for brain injury, dementia link may be effective

Drug intervention for brain injury, dementia link may be effective

By Sports & Health Editor

May 4, 2015

Despite the jargon-packed mouthful it is, the term “chronic traumatic encephalopathy”—a progressive degenerative brain disease associated with concussions—has become a significant talking point in the...

HBO cracks down on ‘Game of Thrones’ watch parties

HBO cracks down on ‘Game of Thrones’ watch parties

April 27, 2015

It’s not a nerd prom without a little disappointment. Geek Bar Beta in Chicago’s trendy Wicker Park neighborhood was planning to host a blowout for the “Game of Thrones” season five premiere ear...

Ald. Bob Fioretti Concedes: ‘We Did Do Change’

February 25, 2015

Former Ald. Bob Fioretti conceded his bid for mayor Tuesday at his election party, held at the Holiday Inn Mart Plaza, 350 W. Mart Center Drive. In his speech, he addressed issues in Chicago, such as c...

Chicago button museum expands

Chicago button museum expands

February 23, 2015

Thousands of pinback buttons have found a home at Chicago’s Busy Beaver Button Museum, 3279 W. Armitage Ave., the only museum in the world that showcases buttons.The museum will relocate to a larger ...

Researchers unearth new bacteria-resistant antibiotic

Researchers unearth new bacteria-resistant antibiotic

January 26, 2015

Scientists have searched for ways to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria for nearly 30 years, but it turns out the answer may have been under their feet the entire time. Researchers from Northeastern ...

Featured Athlete: Pierce Harger

Featured Athlete: Pierce Harger

January 26, 2015

Pierce Harger, a fifth-year senior at Northwestern University double majoring in economics and industrial engineering, has been wrestling since the age of four. Originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, Harger was re...

Cooking robot may offer artificial culinary intelligence

By Sports & Health Editor

January 26, 2015

One of the greatest questions in developing of artificial intelligence is how to provide robots with a software template that enables them to recognize objects and learn actions by watching humans. Researchers from the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and the National Information Communications Technology Research Centre of Excellence in Australia have developed a software system that allows robots to learn actions and make inferences by watching cooking videos from YouTube.“It’s very difficult [to teach robots] actions where something is manipulated because there’s a lot of variation in the way the action happens,” said co-author Cornelia Fermüller, a research scientist at the University of Maryland’s Institute for Advanced Computer Studies. “If I do it or someone else does it, we do it very differently. We could use different tools so you have to find a way of capturing this variation. ”The intelligent system that enabled the robot to glean information from the videos includes two artificial neural networks that mimic the human eye’s processing resulting in object recognition, according to the study. The networks enabled the robot to recognize objects it viewed in the videos and determine the type of grasp required to manipulate objects such as knives and tomatoes when chopping, dicing and preparing food. “In addition to [accounting for variation] there is the difficulty involved in capturing it visually,” Fermüller said. “We’ve looked at the goal of the task and then decomposed it on the basis of that.”Fermüller said the group classified the two types of grasping the robot performed as “power” versus “precision.” Broadly, power grasping is used when an object needs to be held firmly in order to apply force—like when holding a knife to make a cut. Holding a tomato in place to stabilize it is considered precision grasping—a more fine-grain action that calls for accuracy, according to the paper. When observing human activity in real life, robotic systems are able to perceive the movements and objects they are designed to recognize in three dimensions over time, Fermüller said. However, when the movement and objects are viewed in a video, that information is not as immediately understood. “The way we think of videos is as a three-dimensional entity in the sense that there are two dimensions of space and one dimension of time,” said Jason Corso, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. “It’s not as 3D as the world we live in, but one can use a video … which is a spacetime signal, and from it correspond feature points that could be used to reconstruct the 3D environment that is being seen or imaged in that video.”According to the paper, the development of deep neural networks that are able to efficiently capture raw data from video and enable robots to perceive actions and objects have revolutionized how visual recognition in artificially intelligent systems function. The algorithms programmed into the University of Maryland’s cooking robot are one example of this neural functioning.“So what was used here was really the hand description and object tool description, and then the action was inferred out of that,” Fermüller said. Previous research on robotic manipulation and action recognition has been conducted using hand trackers and motion capture gloves to overcome the inherent limitations of trying to design artificial intelligence that can learn by example, she said. “Part of the problem is that robot hands today are so behind what biological manipulation is capable of,” said Ken Forbus, a professor of computer science and education at Northwestern University. “We have more dynamic range in terms of our touch sensing. It’s very, very difficult to calibrate, as there’s all sorts of problems that might be real problems and any system is going to have to solve them.”Forbus said some of the difficulty that presents itself in robotic design arises from the fact that the tools robots are outfitted with are far behind the ones humans are born with both physically and in terms of sense perception.“There is tons of tacit knowledge in human understanding—tons,” Forbus said. “Not just in manipulation, [but] in conceptual knowledge.”According to Forbus, artificial intelligence researchers have three ways to incorporate this type of conceptual thinking into intelligent systems. The first option is to try to design robots that can think and analyze in a manner superior to humans, and the second is articulating the tacit knowledge that humans possess by trying to boil it down into a programmable set of rules. The third way is to attempt to model the AI on the type of analogical thinking humans use as they discern information and make generalizations that help provide a framework for how to act during future experiences. “That’s a model that’s daunting in the sense that it requires lots and lots of [programmed] experience,” Forbus said. “But it’s promising in that if we can make analogical generalization work in scale … it’s going to be a very human-like way of doing it.”

‘Feeling of presence’ demystified

‘Feeling of presence’ demystified

By Assistant Sports & Health Editor

November 17, 2014

Mountaineers sometimes report the sensation of a nearby presence as they scale great heights, as if someone was right behind them—off to the left or the right a bit—but out of sight. Healthy minds ...

NCAA, University of Michigan team up to fight mental illness.

NCAA, University of Michigan team up to fight mental illness.

By Assistant Sports & Health Editor

November 17, 2014

In an effort to combat the widespread stigma associated with mental illness, the University of Michigan has launched Athletes Connected, a project that aims to support  student athletes as they deal with me...

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