The Columbia Chronicle

Underground hip-hop veteran visits Chicago

November 12, 2012

“Rap won’t save you,” the mantra of the Twin Cities rap collective Doomtree, is repeated in song lyrics and printed on all of its merchandise.Founding member Andrew Sims, however, credits rap for much of his success. Listening to mainstream and underground hip-hop artists, such as the Wu-Tang Clan, helped him cope during a tough childhood, when his musician parents often left Sims to watch over himself and his young...

Holine finds folk fame via YouTube

By Emily Ornberg

October 15, 2012

Kiersten Holine has become a rockstar without leaving her room.After singing and playing guitar as a hobby, her family convinced her to put a few of her folk song covers on YouTube.“That went a lot better than I thought it would,” Holine said.Now, her channel has hundreds of thousands of views and developed a fan base large enough to catch the attention of Rolling Stone magazine.Her videos showcase her warm, passionat...

Students teach in low-income schools

By Lisa Schulz

April 27, 2012

In the most poverty-stricken areas of the nation, the opportunity for a good education can be hindered because of low income. In an effort to create change, seven seniors from Columbia will contribute their knowledge to public schools across the country.The nonprofit organization Teach For America selects high achievers to teach in public schools throughout the U.S. Applicants for the two-year program are chosen annually ba...

Cameras catch speed

By Gregory Cappis

November 14, 2011

It’s all about the children, according to Mayor Rahm Emanuel.Both houses of the Illinois General Assembly have approved a bill that would allow speed cameras to be placed within 1/8 of a mile of schools and parks. Current red-light cameras could be converted to monitor speed, and mobile monitoring units could be put in priority zones, if Governor Pat Quinn signs the legislation. The cameras would ticket motorists traveling...

FBI raids activists’ homes

By The Columbia Chronicle

October 4, 2010

by: Darryl Holliday and Meghan KeyesIt is 7 a.m. on a Friday morning, and Doug Michel is in Minnesota visiting his friends, whom he met working on a protest at the 2008 Republican National Convention. There’s a knock at the apartment door. The FBI enters, serving a search warrant and a subpoena to one of the roommates, Tracy Molm. By Michel’s account, he and friends were instructed to sit in the corner, asked not to move...

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