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Finding the Edge: Online vs Casino Gaming

By Sponsored Content

April 16, 2018

Many of us are familiar with brick-and-mortar casinos, even if we’ve never been to one. We also know about betting on things like horse races. But what about online gambling? Is there are reason to do one or the other, besides the obvious factor of whether or not you feel like going to a “real” casino, or are they pretty much identical besides the physical difference? Gambling is gambling, of course: you risk money, you wi...

The City of Chicago is the second entity to sue U.S. Steel, a corporation that sits across the lake in Portage, Indiana, visible from Promontory Point in Hyde Park. U.S. Steel violated its clean water permit when it discharged chromium into the lake last year. 

City sues US Steel for polluting Lake Michigan

January 29, 2018

After public outcry and a lawsuit from the Surfrider Foundation—a nonprofit environmental organization that works to protect water—Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Chicago Corporation Counsel Ed Siskel filed a city...

Mayor Rahm Emanuel and 19 mayors from five different continents exchange ideas for waterway development projects Mar. 13.

19 worldwide mayors ban together against EPA cuts

March 13, 2017

Mayor Rahm Emanuel was joined by 18 mayors from 11 different countries for an Urban Waterways Forum to exchange ideas for waterway development projects to create economic growth and higher environmental...

Merit pay plan sparks college debate, undermines staff

By Editor-in-Chief

January 25, 2016

Just before the college community departed from the campus for the winter break, the United Staff of Columbia College, the college’s staff union, had rallied for a cost-of-living adjustment, with COLA signs and soda cans decorating the walls and stairwells of many campus buildings.As reported Dec. 14, 2015, by The Chronicle, the staff union has been in negotiations with the college administration for almost three years to have th...

Stephanie Preston and Jean Cate hope to open Vignette Vignette, a community art space coming to the Andersonville and Edgewater neighborhoods, in June. When the space opens, Preston and Cate, along with other local artists, will lead monthlong and one-night workshops and summer camps for children.

New Andersonville community art space promotes positivity

March 30, 2015

Two enthusiastic former art students from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago hope to open a brand new community art space in June. Vignette Vignette is a community art space coming to the Andersonvill...

David Oliva “cooling off” under an ice floe on Lake Michigan. Oliva said he has been braving frigid waters around the world as a winter swimmer for more than 35 years.

More than a polar plunge

February 23, 2015

With temperatures sinking to subzero, the last thing on most Chicagoans’ minds is a leisurely swim in Lake Michigan. For Steve Hernan, though, a winter day is just as good a day for a dip as any other,...

'One century minus a baker's dozen:' Finding the forest for the trees in the translation of literature

‘One century minus a baker’s dozen:’ Finding the forest for the trees in the translation of literature

November 17, 2014

“Fourscore and seven years ago” is a phrase every American knows. Abraham Lincoln began his Gettysburg Address to a war-weary crowd of Pennsylvanians with those five words on a Thursday afternoon in Novembe...

Artists, streaming services in continuous tug-of-war

By Managing Editor

October 6, 2014

Mark Volman and Howard Kaylan—aka Flo & Eddie—of The Turtles, a popular 1960s band, are now fighting for proper compensation for the use of their music by streaming and radio services like Pandora. Most known for songs “Happy Together” and “It Ain’t Me Babe,” The Turtles won a lawsuit Sept. 22 against SiriusXM for the uncompensated use of their pre-1972 recordings, according to an Oct. 2 article in The H...

Uneven wealth distribution affects more than just income

By Maria Castellucci Opinions Editor

October 6, 2014

Mohamed El-Erian, former CEO of Pacific Investment Management Company, a global investment management firm, gained notoriety after a blog post went viral last week where he admitted the reason he quit his job last January was because his 10-year-old daughter presented him with a list of 22 events he missed in her life.Commentators praised El-Erian for quitting his high-profile job to spend more quality time with his child, bu...

Keep Lucas museum on Lake Michigan

By Opinions Editor

September 2, 2014

A June 24 announcement that George Lucas, creator of the “Star Wars” series, plans to pursue a Museum Campus location for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art has sparked debate between Lucas enthusiasts and environmentalists.Mayor Rahm Emanuel has voiced his support for the museum, which is expected to generate $2 to $2.2 billion over a 10-year period in tourism revenue. Lucas will fund the museum’s site’s $2 million environmental clean-up and construction process, according to the article on pages 22-23. However, environmentalists are concerned that the possible pollutants underneath the site will be harmful when exposed, and the construction of the museum will violate a 1973 ordinance outlawing private development along the lakefront.It has been suggested by Friends of the Parks, an organization that works to protect Chicago’s parks, that Lucas move his museum to a different site in Chicago, possibly to a South or West Side neighborhood where blighted communities could benefit from the addition. However, because Lucas is funding the museum and any clean up, his wishes should be respected or Chicago could risk losing out on a significant economic booster and a unique cultural institution housing Lucas’ extensive collection of art.Those opposed to the Museum Campus site, such as Friends of the Parks, are not looking at the bigger picture. Friends of the Parks is concerned that the lakefront will be too congested and lack open space, according to a May 20 Friends of the Parks press release. However, the site of the potential museum is currently located on Solider Field and McCormick Place parking lots. While tailgating Bears fans enjoy the lots, they are not there to enjoy the view of Lake Michigan. Lucas also plans on including landscaping and a pedestrian bridge, according to a July 28 museum press release.The unearthing of potentially carcinogenic pollutants remaining from the Great Chicago Fire of 1871–detected by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency beneath the lots–has also concerned some environmentalists. The toxic residue of the Chicago Fire should not prevent Chicago from accepting a museum, especially because many buildings have been erected in the surrounding area since 1871 without apparent ill effect. Environmental cleanup is a normal part of construction in Chicago—many of the city’s neighborhoods are built atop old industry sites.If the city wants to fully reap the benefits from the museum, it is imperative that the museum be a part of the Museum Campus instead of placing it in another neighborhood. The Chicago City Pass, a popular tourist purchase, allows access to the three Museum Campus institutions—the Shedd Aquarium, Adler Planetarium and the Field Museum—for up to 30 days. Because the museums are located close together, visitors can easily jump from one museum to another. If Lucas’ museum is built too far from the Museum Campus, tourists may pass up on the institution.Big plans often necessitate some sacrifices, and the concerns environmentalists have are not without merit, but Lucas’ promise to assume all of the financial responsibilities for the museum can only benefit a city that desperately needs the money. Chicago cannot afford to lose the museum, but Lucas can afford to lose Chicago.

Federal, local grants aim to clean up lake

Federal, local grants aim to clean up lake

May 5, 2014

Mayor Rahm Emanuel has joined the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts to improve Lake Michigan’s water quality. During an April 26 press conference, the EPA announced that it would aw...

President Obama in town, met with protesters

April 7, 2014

President Barack Obama is in Chicago April 2 to raise funds for the Democratic National Committee. However, his short visit attracted environmental protestors. Activists crowded West Fullerton Avenue i...

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