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Tarot next trend in self-love culture

Tarot next trend in self-love culture

By Alexandra Yetter

February 2, 2019

With over 30,000 followers on Instagram, yoga instructor and intuitive healer Kate Van Horn is part of a growing social media trend of spirituality intersecting with health and wellness.What some may ...

Hugh Lee is a ‘Class Act’

Hugh Lee is a ‘Class Act’

April 29, 2018

From his life to his laurels, Hugh Lee always keeps it honest. The 22-year-old Chicago rapper keeps it cool, using his witty bars and skilled flow to voice a fresh message. Lee will perform May 2 at Elbo ...

Kickstarters and ‘Lemonade’ stands

Kickstarters and ‘Lemonade’ stands

March 26, 2018

Flipping through comic books as a child, Gabi Mendez, a first year graduate student at the Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia, never found relatable characters. As a queer person of color, Men...

The future of fashion is fluidity

The future of fashion is fluidity

February 2, 2018

A color, a style or a cut of a garment has distinguished a person's gender for decades. Pink has been a symbol for girls and femininity, while blue has been a symbols for boys and masculinity. Social ...

Cure Violence works to reduce violence in Chicago | The Columbia Chronicle

February 27, 2017

Cure Violence hosted an event Feb. 23 at Sidney Austin LLP, 1 S. Dearborn St., to fundraise and increase awareness of its organization, which aims to reduce violence nationwide by taking a public health approach.Music C...

Trump may mean third term for Emanuel

Trump may mean third term for Emanuel

By Eric Bradach

February 6, 2017

Sixteen bullets pumped into 17-year-old Laquan McDonald was the turning point for Mayor Rahm Emanuel. The police dash-cam footage, released November 2015, turned the man who just won re-election in April 2...

Crowdfunding Crayons: Teachers get creative to provide for students

Crowdfunding Crayons: Teachers get creative to provide for students

October 10, 2016

Teresa Jay did not expect to have to pay to do her job. When she began working as an art teacher at Perkins Bass Elementary School in Englewood with several hundred public school students, her school ...

Interactive exhibit demystifies climate change for all ages

Interactive exhibit demystifies climate change for all ages

April 4, 2016

Thunderstorms, floods and heat waves have influenced the changing weather and wardrobe for decades but are now more unpredictable due to global warming. A new climate change exhibit opened April 2 at t...

Cooking robot may offer artificial culinary intelligence

By Sports & Health Editor

January 26, 2015

One of the greatest questions in developing of artificial intelligence is how to provide robots with a software template that enables them to recognize objects and learn actions by watching humans. Researchers from the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and the National Information Communications Technology Research Centre of Excellence in Australia have developed a software system that allows robots to learn actions and make inferences by watching cooking videos from YouTube.“It’s very difficult [to teach robots] actions where something is manipulated because there’s a lot of variation in the way the action happens,” said co-author Cornelia Fermüller, a research scientist at the University of Maryland’s Institute for Advanced Computer Studies. “If I do it or someone else does it, we do it very differently. We could use different tools so you have to find a way of capturing this variation. ”The intelligent system that enabled the robot to glean information from the videos includes two artificial neural networks that mimic the human eye’s processing resulting in object recognition, according to the study. The networks enabled the robot to recognize objects it viewed in the videos and determine the type of grasp required to manipulate objects such as knives and tomatoes when chopping, dicing and preparing food. “In addition to [accounting for variation] there is the difficulty involved in capturing it visually,” Fermüller said. “We’ve looked at the goal of the task and then decomposed it on the basis of that.”Fermüller said the group classified the two types of grasping the robot performed as “power” versus “precision.” Broadly, power grasping is used when an object needs to be held firmly in order to apply force—like when holding a knife to make a cut. Holding a tomato in place to stabilize it is considered precision grasping—a more fine-grain action that calls for accuracy, according to the paper. When observing human activity in real life, robotic systems are able to perceive the movements and objects they are designed to recognize in three dimensions over time, Fermüller said. However, when the movement and objects are viewed in a video, that information is not as immediately understood. “The way we think of videos is as a three-dimensional entity in the sense that there are two dimensions of space and one dimension of time,” said Jason Corso, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. “It’s not as 3D as the world we live in, but one can use a video … which is a spacetime signal, and from it correspond feature points that could be used to reconstruct the 3D environment that is being seen or imaged in that video.”According to the paper, the development of deep neural networks that are able to efficiently capture raw data from video and enable robots to perceive actions and objects have revolutionized how visual recognition in artificially intelligent systems function. The algorithms programmed into the University of Maryland’s cooking robot are one example of this neural functioning.“So what was used here was really the hand description and object tool description, and then the action was inferred out of that,” Fermüller said. Previous research on robotic manipulation and action recognition has been conducted using hand trackers and motion capture gloves to overcome the inherent limitations of trying to design artificial intelligence that can learn by example, she said. “Part of the problem is that robot hands today are so behind what biological manipulation is capable of,” said Ken Forbus, a professor of computer science and education at Northwestern University. “We have more dynamic range in terms of our touch sensing. It’s very, very difficult to calibrate, as there’s all sorts of problems that might be real problems and any system is going to have to solve them.”Forbus said some of the difficulty that presents itself in robotic design arises from the fact that the tools robots are outfitted with are far behind the ones humans are born with both physically and in terms of sense perception.“There is tons of tacit knowledge in human understanding—tons,” Forbus said. “Not just in manipulation, [but] in conceptual knowledge.”According to Forbus, artificial intelligence researchers have three ways to incorporate this type of conceptual thinking into intelligent systems. The first option is to try to design robots that can think and analyze in a manner superior to humans, and the second is articulating the tacit knowledge that humans possess by trying to boil it down into a programmable set of rules. The third way is to attempt to model the AI on the type of analogical thinking humans use as they discern information and make generalizations that help provide a framework for how to act during future experiences. “That’s a model that’s daunting in the sense that it requires lots and lots of [programmed] experience,” Forbus said. “But it’s promising in that if we can make analogical generalization work in scale … it’s going to be a very human-like way of doing it.”

The Chronicle talks artistry, music history and fashion with AEMMP records | The Columbia Chronicle

December 8, 2014

Arts & Entertainment Media Management Practicum members talk about their success in the music industry, the roots of their passion and what they feel most comfortable wearing.For more multimedia co...

Pediatric medicine’s damaging oversight

Pediatric medicine’s damaging oversight

October 13, 2014

In 1889, pediatric surgeon William Hill was removing the tonsils from children with obstructed airways to alleviate their struggles with breathing when he noticed unforeseen side effects of the procedure. T...

Campus building gets a ghostly facade

By Ivana Hester

September 16, 2012

Renovations to the 618 S. Michigan Ave. Building are coming to an end, and the innovative facade is almost complete.The new design features a ghostly image replicating the original terra-cotta front designed by William Carbys Zimmerman in 1913. Close inspection reveals the design is composed entirely of miniature birds etched into glass panels.According to Alicia Berg, vice president of Campus Environment, it was 2004 alumnus...

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