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Behind the Scenes: The 90’s Show

November 24, 2014

Columbia’s Urban Music Association hosts the annual 90’s Show in the 618 S Michigan Ave Building at Stage two. The show is a tribute to the music, performing arts and fashion of the 1990’s. Columbia...

Lets Talk: The Voice of the Student Body

November 24, 2014

Columbia’s student government association coordinated “Let’s Talk” at Hokin Hall in the 623 S. Wabash building on Nov. 18. The event allowed students to voice their opinion about what they like and di...

Napoleon Maddox leads beatbox symposium for creatives

Napoleon Maddox leads beatbox symposium for creatives

November 24, 2014

The Black Vocality II symposium, hosted by the Center for Black Music Research at Columbia, held Nov. 18–19 at the Music Center, 1014 S. Michigan Ave., featured live performance art and conversation f...

SGA says ‘Let’s Talk,’ students talk back

SGA says ‘Let’s Talk,’ students talk back

November 24, 2014

The Student Government Association held its annual “Let’s Talk” college wide forum Nov. 18 for students to express their concerns about the college at Hokin Hall in the 623 S. Wabash Ave. Buildi...

Detroit’s Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. turn funs into funky

Detroit’s Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. turn funs into funky

November 24, 2014

Through its infectious beats and synth-pop style, Detroit-based Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. is becoming one of indie music’s most prolific rising stars. With members Daniel Zott, Joshua Epstein, Mike Higg...

‘No Genre’ music seminar brings B.o.B, DJ MoonDawg to campus

‘No Genre’ music seminar brings B.o.B, DJ MoonDawg to campus

By Assistant Campus Editor

November 17, 2014

The Student Programming Board partnered with Atlantic Records to bring a panel of distinguished members of the hip-hop community to campus.Hip-hop artists Bobby Ray Simmons Jr., who performs under the name B...

Student Veteran Society honors comrades

Student Veteran Society honors comrades

November 17, 2014

The Student Veterans Society hosted its second annual Veterans Day celebration Nov. 11 in honor of Columbia’s student veterans and veteran staff and faculty at the Conaway Center in the 1104 S. Wabas...

Menu labeling molds ‘architecture of choice’

By Assistant Sports & Health Editor

November 17, 2014

A recent study from the University of Glasgow in Scotland successfully linked calorie labeling on menus with reduced weight gain for the first time. Over the course of 36 weeks, a group of students given no calorie information gained eight pounds on average. The following year, a separate group was presented with prominently displayed labels on their dinner menus and at the serving point where they received their meals for another 36-week period. The latter group gained only four pounds on average—a decrease of Sc50 percent.The results were presented Nov. 5 during the Obesity Journal Symposium at The Obesity Society’s annual meeting in Boston.“We used prominent calorie labels—big and colorful—so they could not really be missed by the students,” said Charoula Nikolaou, lead author of the study and a Ph. D. student at the University of Glasgow’s School of Medicine. “All previous calorie labeling studies used quite small information—they’re supposed to be the same size as the price [of the meal].”About a dozen studies have looked at the relationship between calorie labeling and weight gain in U.S. chain restaurants and have seen little to no effect, according to Sara Bleich, associate professor of Health Policy at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and spokeswoman for The Obesity Society.“I think the biggest challenge for people is they don’t make a lot of sense of calorie information,” Bleich said. “Most people don’t know how X number of calories in a particular item would fit into a recommendation of about 2,000 calories per day. Even given that calorie benchmark, expecting people to make those calculations at the point of purchase is unlikely.”Bleich said pre-packaged foods research shows that consumers do not have a good sense of nutrient compositions, vitamin content or even how to properly read a label. When it comes to ordering from a menu, consumers are expected to not only understand what the nutrition content of the meal is but also how the calories will fit into daily recommendations. According to Nikolaou, calorie content is generally related to fat content. By displaying the number of calories in a meal, students were automatically being nudged away from higher-fat meals. The researchers also analyzed micronutrient information and found that the lower-calorie meals were no worse in terms of vitamin and mineral content. “We had some anxiety they’d end up with unbalanced meals if they just focused on calories,” said Mike Lean, professor and chair of Human Nutrition at the University of Glasgow. “But because of the emphasis on meals, not pieces of a meal, that tended not to be true.”Although calorie labeling is not a  treatment for obesity, it is a form of primary prevention that has been severely lacking worldwide, according to Lean. Research shows the trajectory of weight gain is set in early adolescence, rising in the teenage years and early adulthood before leveling off later in life. “Education has shown itself not to be effective, which is why food companies are very happy to put out a lot of educational materials—it doesn’t change the way people choose,” Lean said. Nikolaou called it “changing the architecture around food choices,” or redefining the factors that influence how people determine what food to order. Lean said the labels are not big enough or prominent enough to impact customers in New York City, where calorie labeling is legally mandated in franchised restaurants. The ambiguous results of prior calorie labeling studies seem to suggest that a highly-visible, daily reminder is necessary for successful results, he said.During a portion of the second year of the study, the labels were removed from menus. Nikolaou said this removal of the constant reminder resulted in a slight increase in the calorie content of the meals students chose.“They were relying on these labels, and if you took them away, even only for five weeks, they started to drift back,” Lean said. “They clearly did not automatically focus on the [meals] which we knew—but they didn’t know—to be lower in calories. They needed that regular nudge.”Another important finding was that the caterers, who Lean said had been resistant to the labels at the onset of the study, ended up reducing their food costs by a third. “There’s a lot of nonsense out there, people saying that lower-calorie foods or healthier foods are going to be more expensive,” Lean said. “The answer is no. They can be, but they don’t have to be.”While the participants were less apt to choose lower-calorie meals when the labels were removed, the low cost and daily nudging effect that calorie labeling provides may be able to influence long-term changes in consumer food choices, according to the study.“We’re optimists,” Lean said. “Changing the environment on a daily basis results in people eating that little bit less and not gaining weight. I’m quite sure there is an entraining effect, but it’s probably minor. We need a permanent change in the environment of making food choices.”

Jeremih visits Columbia to recruit talent

Jeremih visits Columbia to recruit talent

November 17, 2014

Renowned R&B artist Jeremih Felton, known as Jeremih, visited Columbia Nov. 12 to recruit potential band members for his upcoming tour and speak with students about his time in the music industry.Felton ...

Listen Up Alex Ross Perry: Your Prose Is Pedantic

By Brandon Howard

November 10, 2014

“Listen Up Philip,” the latest film by independent writer/director Alex Ross Perry, marks a nail in the coffin for mumblecore filmmaking. Perry’s latest offering is next in the rotation of films such as “Tiny Furniture” and “Francis Ha,” which primarily follow privileged white characters as they navigate their careers and character flaws in an urban New York City setting.Through film, stories can be conveyed w...

Strategic Plan sessions kick off at Columbia

Strategic Plan sessions kick off at Columbia

November 10, 2014

A series of roundtable discussions designed to attract input from students, staff and faculty kicked off Nov. 5 when attendees began weighing in on issues the college faces as it drafts its strategic plan. More faculty and staff members than students filled Ferguson Auditorium ...

Haka exhibit shines at Field Museum

By Nancy Cooper

November 10, 2014

In an era when twerking is taking center stage at many venues, The Field Museum is trying to educate people about a historic dance move called haka. The museum is hosting an exhibit through Dec. 1 about the traditional Maori dance used on the battlefield or to display pride and unity.Traditionally, haka includes very aggressive foot-stomping, tongue protrusions and rhythmic body slapping accompanied by a loud chant. Eric Rush, a New Z...

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