The Columbia Chronicle

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NFL must turn over nonprofit status

March 31, 2014

The NFL is one of the most widely recognized and profitable organizations in the U.S., yet its league office is exempt from paying federal income taxes. As an organization without a charitable purpose, allowing any of its functions, no matter how small, to slip under the radar of the Internal Revenue Service is a gross abuse of the benefits of nonprofit status.The NFL is a 501(c)(6) organization, the source of its exemption, but...

Budget cannot soldier through renovation

March 17, 2014

Chicago’s finances are in dire straits, but even in the face of the looming budget shortfall, Mayor Rahm Emanuel is dreaming up expensive renovations for Soldier Field. Clearly, the reality of Chicago’s fiscal difficulties has not hit him hard enough.Emanuel said in a press briefing following the March 5 City Council meeting that he wants to draft a 5,000-seat expansion of Soldier Field in an attempt to host the Super B...

'Animals' gets wild at SXSW

‘Animals’ gets wild at SXSW

February 10, 2014

As the annual South by Southwest film festival approaches, Collin Schiffli a 2005 film & video alumnus, is excited for his new film “Animals” to debut at the festival. “Animals,” a film set in Chicago follows a young homeless couple battling addiction while living o...

(left) Cooper Grodin and (right) Julia Udine of Phantom of the Opera.

Act two of Theatre Week becomes annual promotion

February 3, 2014

Thespians and theatre aficionados alike will celebrate the rich tradition and lively Chicago theatre scene with the second annual Chicago Theatre Week.Running Feb. 11–16, popular productions such as ...

Cutting classes bleeds students

January 27, 2014

Planning a class schedule that fulfills graduation requirements can be difficult, but it becomes next to impossible when core classes are cancelled days before the semester starts, a frustrating reality Columbia students are beginning to face more often.The climb in course cancellations can be partially attributed to Columbia’s five-year enrollment decline, which has left some departments with too many classes and not enough students to fill them, as reported Sept. 16 by The Chronicle.Dropping classes can bandage the college’s anemic budget, but doing so based on size alone, at the expense of students and faculty who rely on them, is not responsible. The seniors particularly have reason to be nervous about course cancellations because it may force them to enroll in an extra semester at Columbia, a blow to the wallet many of them cannot take.Several attempts to contact members of the administration resulted in referrals to Interim Provost Louise Love’s office. Love said the target average for every class throughout Columbia has been raised to 15 students, the latest in a history of fluctuating class size requirements. So, not every class has to have 15 students, but if one has 10, then another has to have 20 to balance it out. Love said the deans and the department chairs have the discretion to make the final judgment on which classes to run and which to cancel. In theory, that should lead to equitable results but, to judge from student complaints, that’s often not the case. When the new provost takes office, he or she needs to address this situation and come up with a procedure that flags courses that are essential to a senior’s graduation or that are offered so rarely that students never have the chance to take them.Adding insult to injury, the under-resourced and overworked advising staff is not always available to counsel students on what to do after a key class has been cancelled. Under normal circumstances, scheduling a meeting can take weeks, and the situation is even worse during registration week. Students who want to replace a cancelled class with an equivalent requirement need to meet with a college advisor, but the advising center’s policy is to make all appointments walk-in only during registration week, which stymies many students’ attempts to reconstruct their schedules around a cancelled course. Expanding the resources for the advising center is another item for the incoming provost’s to-do list.Cancelling some classes may be unavoidable, but when it needs to be done for the purpose of the college’s budget, it should happen sooner rather than later. It’s inexcusable to both faculty members and the students who have registered for a class to discontinue the class only a few days before the semester starts. While it’s understandable that a department head would want to wait until the last minute to see if a course can meet its enrollment minimum, the ensuing stress that students experience is unfair and unacceptable. More importantly, each student should have the right to customize his or her education at Columbia, and cancelling the more esoteric classes in favor of the more popular ones limits students’ abilities to do so. Additionally, department heads should reallocate displaced students into classes that may be already full if those students need them to graduate on time. Even if the class has already met its enrollment limit, adding one or two students will not damage the small-class environment that Columbia promotes.The college has legitimate monetary reasons to cancel classes, but not at the expense of its students. Fundamental changes to the advising center’s resources and revisiting the college’s cancellation process could help students avoid choking down the cost of extra unnecessary semesters.

Featured Artist: Deavondre Jones

January 24, 2014

He calls it "DanceSpire." Deavondre Jones, a junior arts, entertainment & media management major, mixes dance, marketing and motivational speaking into one package that he hopes will inspire people to...

Vice President of Student Affairs Mark Kelly throws up a hook shot during the Nov. 13 3-on-3 Renegades basketball tournament at the Goodman Center.

Columbia, Roosevelt basketball tournament brings heat

November 18, 2013

TWENTY-SEVEN TEAMS OF Columbia and Roosevelt students gathered at the Lillian and Larry Goodman Center, 50 E. Parkway, Nov. 13 for a 3-on-3 basketball tournament to compete for tickets to the Dec. 5 Chicago B...

Making cents of textbook sales

By Alexandra Kukulka

January 28, 2013

Textbooks are a necessary expense for college students, but that doesn’t make their often astronomical price tags any more bearable. Adding to the financial woe is the often frustrating experience of selling books, usually for much less than what students originally paid.But not many students know where that missing money ends up.When selling books back to the bookstore at the end of the semester, the most a student can b...

Chit-Chat with the Renegades

By Ahmed Hamad

January 28, 2013

Assistant Sports & Health Editor Nader Ihmoud catches up with Abby Cress, president of Columbia's Renegades, for our weekly Chit-Chat.http://youtu.be/b3vY--V8JW4"Renegades" "Columbia" "Columbia College" "Columbia College Chicago" "Columbia College Renegades" "Columbia Renegades" "Sports" "College Sports" "Club Sports"

Northwestern Wildcats prepare for another Big Ten opponent

By Nader Ihmoud

January 22, 2013

http://youtu.be/1Kh6TyibGtAThe Northwestern University Wildcats will continue Big Ten play when the No. 12 ranked University of Minnesota Gophers visit Welsh Ryan Arena on Jan. 23.The Wildcats (11–8) are 2–4 against conference opponents and have posted a 6–7 record at home this season. The Wildcats have won the last five meetings between the two teams at Welsh Ryan. Northwestern’s only road loss happened during the ...

Brush strokes of genius: An interview with MUA Siân Richards

By Sophia Coleman

January 16, 2013

Not many people are born directly into their career, but such is the case with Siân Richards, a film makeup artist whose work can be seen in upcoming comedy “Movie 43” and Golden Globe nominated “Cloud Atlas.”Richards was born in England 1968 when her father, Hu Richards, worked as a makeup artist for “2001: A Space Odyssey.” She said her father was told his wife was in labor while on set and he immediately l...

Student group plans benefit to help ailing Chicago girl

By Contributing Writer

December 3, 2012

By Tyler Eagle, Contributing WriterColumbia’s chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America will partner with Be The Match, a national nonprofit dedicated to finding donors for bone marrow and stem cell transplants, for an event to help find a bone marrow match for Nyiah Young, a 7-year-old Chicago native with sickle cell anemia.The event will be held Dec. 5 in the Wabash Campus Building, 623 S. Wabash Ave., ...

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