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College finds ‘Niche’ with diversity ranking

College finds ‘Niche’ with diversity ranking

January 26, 2015

In early January, Niche, a website that provides reviews and expert insight about schools and other organizations, released a ranking of colleges based on their excellence in campus-wide diversity, and Co...

Hockey

Ice hockey off to rough start, team stays optimistic

January 26, 2015

The Renegades ice hockey team is experiencing a cold snap during its first season. Since its Dec. 14 debut, the team has lost one game and forfeited four others for lack of player attendance. Attendance is a pr...

Bittersweet ending, new beginning

By Associate Editor

December 8, 2014

Despite not traveling much out of the state of Michigan, I was brave enough to leave my home and family behind for a new life in Chicago. Now I am proud to say I will be the first in my immediate family to graduate from college. Coming from a single-parent household in Detroit, Michigan, I knew my family would only be able to do so much. With that said, I knew my success—or failure—would mostly rest on my shoulders. For...

Madison Zielinski, a freshman creative writing major and a student in “Anatomies of Slam Poetry,” won first place at the college’s first poetry slam hosted by Zielinski’s class and the “Club Management: Practicum” course.

Interdisciplinary collaboration presents first-ever poetry slam

December 8, 2014

Nine poets competed for best poet of the night at Columbia’s first-ever poetry slam. Madison Zielinski, a freshman creative writing major, won over the judges and took first place at the Dec. 4 contest held ...

Renegades officers (left to right) Mike Sempek, a junior television major; Ryan Miller, a senior marketing communications major; and Scott Wilson, a senior cinema art + science major, discuss future Renegades plans.

The Renegades acknowledge progress, aim for integration.

December 1, 2014

After a semester that saw the addition of three teams and several successful fundraisers, the Renegades are continuing to make their presence on campus known.The Renegades have enjoyed an increased turnout a...

Cubs vs. Sox

Cubs, Sox clash in new exhibit

November 24, 2014

There may be no greater rivalry between Major League Baseball teams that share the same city than that of the Chicago Cubs and the Chicago White Sox. The rivalry has lasted since the teams first took t...

Menu labeling molds ‘architecture of choice’

By Assistant Sports & Health Editor

November 17, 2014

A recent study from the University of Glasgow in Scotland successfully linked calorie labeling on menus with reduced weight gain for the first time. Over the course of 36 weeks, a group of students given no calorie information gained eight pounds on average. The following year, a separate group was presented with prominently displayed labels on their dinner menus and at the serving point where they received their meals for another 36-week period. The latter group gained only four pounds on average—a decrease of Sc50 percent.The results were presented Nov. 5 during the Obesity Journal Symposium at The Obesity Society’s annual meeting in Boston.“We used prominent calorie labels—big and colorful—so they could not really be missed by the students,” said Charoula Nikolaou, lead author of the study and a Ph. D. student at the University of Glasgow’s School of Medicine. “All previous calorie labeling studies used quite small information—they’re supposed to be the same size as the price [of the meal].”About a dozen studies have looked at the relationship between calorie labeling and weight gain in U.S. chain restaurants and have seen little to no effect, according to Sara Bleich, associate professor of Health Policy at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and spokeswoman for The Obesity Society.“I think the biggest challenge for people is they don’t make a lot of sense of calorie information,” Bleich said. “Most people don’t know how X number of calories in a particular item would fit into a recommendation of about 2,000 calories per day. Even given that calorie benchmark, expecting people to make those calculations at the point of purchase is unlikely.”Bleich said pre-packaged foods research shows that consumers do not have a good sense of nutrient compositions, vitamin content or even how to properly read a label. When it comes to ordering from a menu, consumers are expected to not only understand what the nutrition content of the meal is but also how the calories will fit into daily recommendations. According to Nikolaou, calorie content is generally related to fat content. By displaying the number of calories in a meal, students were automatically being nudged away from higher-fat meals. The researchers also analyzed micronutrient information and found that the lower-calorie meals were no worse in terms of vitamin and mineral content. “We had some anxiety they’d end up with unbalanced meals if they just focused on calories,” said Mike Lean, professor and chair of Human Nutrition at the University of Glasgow. “But because of the emphasis on meals, not pieces of a meal, that tended not to be true.”Although calorie labeling is not a  treatment for obesity, it is a form of primary prevention that has been severely lacking worldwide, according to Lean. Research shows the trajectory of weight gain is set in early adolescence, rising in the teenage years and early adulthood before leveling off later in life. “Education has shown itself not to be effective, which is why food companies are very happy to put out a lot of educational materials—it doesn’t change the way people choose,” Lean said. Nikolaou called it “changing the architecture around food choices,” or redefining the factors that influence how people determine what food to order. Lean said the labels are not big enough or prominent enough to impact customers in New York City, where calorie labeling is legally mandated in franchised restaurants. The ambiguous results of prior calorie labeling studies seem to suggest that a highly-visible, daily reminder is necessary for successful results, he said.During a portion of the second year of the study, the labels were removed from menus. Nikolaou said this removal of the constant reminder resulted in a slight increase in the calorie content of the meals students chose.“They were relying on these labels, and if you took them away, even only for five weeks, they started to drift back,” Lean said. “They clearly did not automatically focus on the [meals] which we knew—but they didn’t know—to be lower in calories. They needed that regular nudge.”Another important finding was that the caterers, who Lean said had been resistant to the labels at the onset of the study, ended up reducing their food costs by a third. “There’s a lot of nonsense out there, people saying that lower-calorie foods or healthier foods are going to be more expensive,” Lean said. “The answer is no. They can be, but they don’t have to be.”While the participants were less apt to choose lower-calorie meals when the labels were removed, the low cost and daily nudging effect that calorie labeling provides may be able to influence long-term changes in consumer food choices, according to the study.“We’re optimists,” Lean said. “Changing the environment on a daily basis results in people eating that little bit less and not gaining weight. I’m quite sure there is an entraining effect, but it’s probably minor. We need a permanent change in the environment of making food choices.”

R&B artist Jeremih (center) visited Columbia Nov. 12 to speak with students and hold auditions for his upcoming band tour at the Conaway Center in the 1104 S. Wabash Ave. Building. 

Jeremih visits Columbia to recruit talent

November 17, 2014

Renowned R&B artist Jeremih Felton, known as Jeremih, visited Columbia Nov. 12 to recruit potential band members for his upcoming tour and speak with students about his time in the music industry.Felton ...

Justin Eddings, a freshman cinema art + science major, drives past defender Louis Lloyd, a freshman audio arts & acoustics major, to the basket in the first round of the tournament.

Columbia students get buckets

November 17, 2014

The Renegades hosted a 3-on-3 basketball tournament Nov. 12 at Roosevelt University’s Goodman Center, 501 S. Wabash Ave., where students battled it out on the court for free Jersey Mike’s sandwiches and ...

“The Distant Architect” is a noir science-fiction film written and directed by Clara Alcott. The short film tells the story of a Chicago architect who starts to question how she views herself and what she knows about her body. 

Columbia alumna ‘Architect’ of new science-fiction noir film

November 10, 2014

Clara Alcott, a 2001 film + video alumna, first started working on the screenplay for “The Distant Architect” 10 years ago. Originally set to be a full-length movie, it was trimmed to fit a smaller bu...

Falafel

Falafel

November 3, 2014

AS AN ARAB, I grew up eating Arabic food, and falafel is one of my favorites. I always loved to cut a piece of pita bread in half and stuff it with falafel and hummus. The best part about falafel is th...

Miss Black Illinois USA | The Columbia Chronicle

November 3, 2014

Miss Black Illinois USA is a branch of the Miss USA pageant specifically focusing on the African-American community. The pageant encourages young black women to strive for excellence in fitness, scholastic ...

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