The Columbia Chronicle

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Beatrice Watson said she fears the Obama Library development will raise the neighborhood property taxes and push her out of her home.  

Obama library could cause South Side gentrification

April 21, 2017

The new Obama Library’s construction has caused concern from Hyde Park residents, who at an April 18 community meeting said they are afraid it will drive them out of their homes.“We all know what hap...

Alumnus broadcasts history through Cubs win

Alumnus broadcasts history through Cubs win

November 7, 2016

As the Chicago Cubs clinched a historic World Series win Nov. 2 in the bottom of the 10th inning, Dave Miska, a 1994 radio/sound alumnus and sound engineer for Chicago’s CBS Radio, was in the sound booth celebrating as he worked the controls for the Cubs Radio Broadcast. After grad...

Women have the balls for sports

By Opinions Editor

April 11, 2016

The U.S. women’s soccer team won the Women’s World Cup in July 2015, receiving $2 million as prize money. This may seem like a lot, but it’s an embarrassment compared to what men’s teams earn.A year earlier, the men’s team made it only to 11th place in the World Cup yet received an award of $9 million, according to a March 31 article from Money.com. The men’s World Cup winner, Germany, took home $35 million.Th...

Hi, my name is ____ , and I’m in a fandom

By ARTS & CULTURE REPORTER

November 23, 2015

It’s not easy being a fan of World Wrestling Entertainment, or so freshman theatre major Sharonda Tutson discovered when she shared her love of the wrestling program in a class presentation and learned some people thought WWE was for kids, she said.“People don’t think I’m mature because [WWE is] like fake wrestling and has a bunch of cheesy storylines, but I like it,” said Tutson, noting that she has about 40 action figures and 11 games and gets looked down upon because people do not typically expect an 18-year-old girl to collect wrestling action figures.Groups of fans with a particular shared interest are commonly known as fandoms. Each fandom also has factors that contribute to whether they are seen as OK or valid in society like the quality and popularity of the content they appreciate and age or gender of a fan group’s majority. There’s a pecking order in a fandom, with activities that are seen as childish at the bottom and those with an established status, prestige or wide-spread acceptance at the top.Acceptance of a fan group ultimately depends on what a culture thinks is an appropriate thing to be a fan of, said Paul Booth, associate professor of media and cinema studies in the College of Communications at DePaul University. “Outside of media, if you talk about any sort of fan group that’s accepted, your sports fans are going to be much more accepted than any sort of TV or movie fan,” Booth said. “The reason sports fans are rarely looked down upon in our culture is because sports is considered a normal activity. It’s considered a part of everyday life, so sports fans are just doing something ‘normal.’”Tutson said along with her age, she thinks being female makes people look at her more strangely for liking WWE.“WWE is seen as a men’s interest, not women’s,” Tutson said. “To be a girl and own action figures and video games and watch [‘WWE RAW’] every Monday night—it’s different.”Fan activities seen as stereotypically feminine, like a common adoration for a particular movie star, do not fare much better.“If [a fan group] is all females, people are like, ‘Um, this doesn’t really matter because it’s what girls like, and girls just think the guys are attractive, and that’s all that matters to them,’” said Tayler Reed, senior design and creative writing double major and Muggles Association ofColumbia president.Those who retain an interest in childhood games or entertainment are also ridiculed.Freshman film major Graham Frassinelli said he has had a similar experience with his love of Tokusatsu, Japanese live-action TV and movies like “Power Rangers” or “Godzilla.”“A lot of the shows I watch are targeted to an age range of 8- to 13-year-old Japanese youngsters, so I do get some weird looks when I’m watching it, and they’re spouting dialogue that makes no sense outside of a children’s show,” Frassinelli said.Robin Brenner, a teen librarian at the Brookline Public Library in Massachusetts and author of the article “Teen Literature and Fan Culture” in Young Adult Library Services vol. 11 issue 4, said the general power balance of our culture affects how people view fan groups, and if a person is already outside of the mainstream majority, what that person likes is automatically considered less valuable.“There is a gender bias, and there always will be for something young teenage girls like [especially],” Brenner said. “There will be a lot more criticism and policing of the way people are fans.”According to Brenner, people were up in arms a few years ago about the extent to which teenage girls were fans of and enjoyed “The Twilight Saga.”“The Twilight Saga” was a phenomenon among most young women, but it also resonated with adults and became a large fan group that was likened to a cult by people like Miley Cyrus in 2009 and many media sources.Along with gender and age bias, Frassinelli said other factors influence people’s perceptions of fan groups.“Some [fan groups] are based around a work that is not high quality in a lot of people’s eyes, like ‘Twilight,’ and there are fandoms where the work is not necessarily low quality, [but] it’s the actions and the way the people who are into it behave that makes people uncomfortable,” Frassinelli said.So much for external perceptions of fans being the only negativity fans face, because being an active member of a fan group ends up inviting other problems as well. Each fandom has fans who go too far at times like those who make “rules” and try to make other fans prove their knowledge on the material before conceding they are a “real” fan, Brenner said. “It’s just a matter of knowing not every fan is like that,” said Tabitha Rees, a junior business & entrepreneurship major and vice president of Muggles Association of Columbia. “You have to be able to differentiate between the [fans] who go too far and the ones that have an average, healthy relationship.”Reed said she thinks larger fandoms like that of “Harry Potter” tend to be more widely accepted because of the “nostalgia factor.” People understand those types of fandoms because they have been around for so long.Some of those people who are considered most fanatic—the word from which fan is derived—are known as “shippers.” They want the character, actor or artist to be in a relationship with someone of their choosing, often another character, actor or artist. These shippers are known for creating fan art or fanfiction depicting the people they “ship” in a relationship together.“Each fandom has a weird part of it,” Rees said. “Shippers are usually looked down upon in every fandom. I totally get how shippers are looked down upon because there are those crazy ones who make actors uncomfortable.”Rees added people think star-oriented fan groups are only made up of women who watch shows like “Supernatural” because the main characters are attractive, but the fan group has a huge subgroup made up of nonheterosexual women or men.For example, it is assumed the majority of “Glee” fans are teenage girls, when most of the friends Rees has made are either adult women older than 30 or males, she said.“When the loudest part of a fandom is teenage girls, everyone assumes everyone who follows those people is a teenage girl,” said Skyler Ray, Columbia Whovians president—a group devoted to all things related to the BBC show “Doctor Who”—and a senior cinema art + science major. “There’s this crazy atmosphere because they can be really excited and there’s a lot of screaming that happens, but that’s their way of being excited.”In fact, the only difference between teenage girl fandoms and sports fandoms is: it is typically older men screaming instead, which makes it OK, Ray said. If the straight, white male majority of the population can relate to the interest, it confers automatic acceptance.Someone interested in wine or cigars rather than anime is more likely to be considered an aficionado, devotee or connoisseur.  People who do not fit into that straight, white male label have a harder time being accepted for their interests.“I have a friend who is very into One Direction but is a 20-year-old, genderqueer human being, and those [fans] get looked down on so much, even though it’s just four boys running around on stage,” Ray said. “The fact that they have a [mainly] female teenage following, everyone is like, ‘They’re all crazy.’”Or as Booth notes, the things young people are fans of tend to be less valued than the things adults like.“[The prejudice] is not because the fans of One Direction are any different than other fans, it’s that One Direction is considered a juvenile type of fandom,” Booth said.David Zoltan, Fleet Admiral and founder of Geek Bar Beta, 1941 W. North Ave., believes the inherent prejudice against things teenage girls like should be challenged.“We have a culture of people who are deeply passionate about all these various things we surround ourselves with as geeks,” Zoltan said. “We need to find ways to not just celebrate the things we love but the things other people love as well and find ways to celebrate them together in a way that is conducive to all of us living our lives with joy.”Ray and Reed both agreed the ranking system put in place to decide which fandoms deserve respect does not make sense and should not be the social norm.Ray noted people always have “weird” prejudices against things other people like, but no one has any basis for why they are against people liking a certain thing.Reed said respecting everyone’s interests is just the kind thing to do.“People are just shitty,” Reed said. “Just because you love something so much, people want to ruin it for you. They don’t like it, so you shouldn’t like it. I don’t think there’s any good reason people have to be mean about fandoms.”Reed said because YouTube fandoms are still fairly new, older people are still trying to understand why it is popular among the youth.There are different ways to find a fandom one may fit into whether it is online or in person because fan groups exist for almost everything. People who love something a lot will find others who do as well.Brenner said communities can form at conventions, but the biggest communities are forming online. She added that conventions are ways for fans to connect with each other and find other people who like what they like and will not think it is weird.“I think [fandom is] an amazing space people have created outside of school where you learn and create together by helping each other,” Brenner said. “Everyone has that moment in life [when] they find their people—some people have it in high school, some have it in college.”Fan groups help people express their creativity in ways they probably would not otherwise do, and fan art, fanfiction, fan videos and fan music come from a desire to share and be part of the art someone loves, Brenner said.“Anyone who considers themselves part of geek culture should have every right to celebrate within that culture,” Zoltan said. “[At Geek Bar], we embrace the fact we recognize people like ourselves who embrace that geeky side of their nature and have cool stuff they’re doing and want to share with the world.”Rees said she believes attending Columbia and finding people accepting of her fandoms is karma coming back to help her after she lost a friend group in high school because they did not understand her love of “Harry Potter.”“I’m in college now, so I’m supposed to be growing up and getting a life and moving on passed all those children’s franchises, but I can’t bring myself to tear away from them,” Frassinelli said. “They’re such a big part of my identity that I have no desire to let them go away.”

Daily fantasy sports should be state-regulated

By Editorial Board

November 2, 2015

Some play fantasy sports for fun and bragging rights, but others take it more seriously, registering for online daily fantasy sports leagues in hopes of winning large sums of money. Unlike traditional fantasy sports, players in daily fantasy sports leagues compete during the course of a week or a single day, rather than an entire season. Registering to compete in a daily fantasy sports league requires entry fees, which go...

CHI-TOWN LOW DOWN: Light pollution threatens Chicago’s health

By Managing Editor

April 27, 2015

Chicago may be the best-lit city in the U.S., as more than 250,000 sodium vapor lights create orange, ribbon-like patterns throughout the streets extending from the South Side to the North Side. The view from the top of the Willis Tower or flying into O’Hare International Airport at night showcases views of the city’s orange grid-like structure, which can also be seen clearly from space.The city uses a number of different ...

Jameson Swain makes a diving stop to second base and to get the out, tossing  the ball to first baseman Joe Walsh, in a game against DePaul University Baseball on April 18. 

Renegades drop the ball, hold heads high despite season of loss

April 27, 2015

The caps are now off for the Columbia Renegades baseball team as it wrapped up its spring season on April 25.The team got off to a rocky start this year, absorbing three losses in a series against Lewis Univer...

After three seasons, volleyball team still not set

By Sports & Health Reporter

April 27, 2015

Changes in leadership and a failed attempt to join a competitive league have contributed to a disappointing year on the sidelines for the Renegades volleyball team. The team was unable to play competitively this year. The Renegades joined the co-ed Players Sport and Social Group, but because the season’s first game occurred during Spring Break, the Renegades were no longer eligible to compete, according to Vinny Cavello,  ...

Andrew Bailes posed for a photo with Liz Anderson after his April 5 performance of “The One-Woman No-Show.”

‘One-Woman’ show not a solo act

April 20, 2015

Local comedian and writer Liz Anderson is currently staging her one-woman show, “The One-Woman No-Show,” and the only catch is that she is not in the show.“The One-Woman No-Show” is an eight-p...

Athlete Profile: Raphael Anderson-Ayers

Athlete Profile: Raphael Anderson-Ayers

By McKayla Braid

April 13, 2015

Raphael Anderson-Ayers is a 20-year-old sophomore double majoring in marketing and business & entrepreneurship. Adopted from Paraguay in South America at the age of 2, Anderson-Ayers was raised in ...

Cubs fans experience Opening Day woes

By Sports & Health Reporter

April 10, 2015

Wrigley Field opened April 5 for the Cubs’ Opening Day game against the St. Louis Cardinals amid ongoing construction. The Cubs hosted the Cardinals for their first home series of the season before traveling to Colorado for a weekend series. Fans experienced a plethora of problems, from bathroom shortages to trouble navigating the ballpark, according to freshman journalism major Taylor Martin. Martin said he waited in line t...

Halftime from the Sideline

Opening Day exiled to Wrigley Field

April 6, 2015

It’s hard enough to catch a home run ball, and it’s even harder to catch one in the middle of a construction zone.It’s too bad this is the inconvenient truth that is the Chicago Cubs—one disappo...

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