The Columbia Chronicle

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Student debt a national epidemic

Student debt a national epidemic

September 29, 2014

As tuition at colleges across the country continues to rise, student debt remains an epidemic that plagues many students and graduates, and Strike Debt has taken notice. Strike Debt, an organization that began after the Occupy Wall Street movements, is creating Debt Collective, a d...

iHeartMedia a smart change for Clear Channel

By Managing Editor

September 22, 2014

Clear Channel Media Holdings Inc., the largest operator of U.S. radio stations, announced in a Sept. 16 press release that it has changed its name to iHeartMedia to better associate with its digital radio service iHeartRadio and embrace its various media platforms.Since the iHeartRadio app was released in 2008, it has grown wildly popular and served as the online outlet for the company’s 859 radio stations and 245 milli...

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Activists want mental health clinics reopened

September 8, 2014

Two years after half of Chicago’s mental health clinics closed, several aldermen and the Mental Health Movement, a group dedicated to advocating for the mentally ill, are calling for the clinics to reop...

College credit system needs revision

April 28, 2014

From 2013–2014, full-time Columbia students coughed up $22,132 for tuition, a number that will increase to $22,884 in the next academic year. Students are looking to maximize the value of their education, but each semester, many full-time students are charged for credits they do not use— an extra $668 many can’t afford to waste.All full-time Columbia students are billed a uniform price for 12 to 16 credit hours. Any stud...

Robert Bykowski THE CHRONICLE

Editor’s Note

April 21, 2014

This campus is definitely not what it was three years ago when I first moved to Chicago. Shops have closed and chains have opened; walls have been painted and buildings have been torn down—and even burned down—and countless faculty and students have left the campus, deciding this school just wasn’t for them.And although Columbia’s adopted motto, “Create Change,” is something many of us joke about or mock, it’s absolutely fitting. Our students are breaking the mold, our teachers are doing the impossible by working in their fields full-time and also teaching part-time at Columbia, the South Loop community where we reside is quickly becoming a burgeoning neighborhood in the city and the college is progressively working to stay in touch with the way media shapes our lives.So to follow the South Loop and Columbia’s lead, The Chronicle is making a few changes itself to better serve you—our readers. The City Beat section has changed to Metro, which will bring you the latest in developing stories from across the Chicagoland area; the Arts & Entertainment section is now Arts & Culture, keeping you in touch with the people who surround you and the art that inhabits our spaces; and the Campus News section, now Campus, will discuss not only news on Columbia’s campus, but also the issues that affect you as a college student.The idea behind The Chronicle, to become the voice of the Columbia community, hasn’t changed—it’s just being amped up a bit. In our Commentary section, the new Back Talk section will allow you as students and faculty to briefly address your concerns or offer praise via e-mail. Letters to the Editor are still highly encouraged, as many issues just can’t be addressed in less than 75 words.And while you’re e-mailing your Back Talk submissions, please notice the overhaul of The Chronicle’s website. It has become clear in the past few years which direction publications and media are taking, and The Chronicle has decided to follow the same path. Throughout the semester, the website will feature videos, podcasts, blogs, slideshows, articles available only online, breaking news updates and comment capability for readers to comment and give feedback directly on each article. The print edition of The Chronicle has always been an outlet for students to voice their opinions, and now our website will expand this opportunity for feedback to both The Chronicle and Columbia.Perhaps the most notable addition to The Chronicle is the presence of the newspaper on the streets of the South Loop. Twenty free-standing outdoor newsstands are scattered throughout the South Loop, in front of Columbia campus buildings and South Loop establishments, to further demonstrate the importance of the culture Columbia radiates in the South Loop community.For new students who haven’t been around long enough to witness all of these changes: Don’t worry, this community will keep growing and changing. You’ll be able to look back at your first year and remember how things once were. And for returning students: Welcome back. It may not look like the community we first arrived in, but the ideals behind it haven’t changed a bit.

Colleges need to create dorm communities

By Arts & Culture Editor

March 3, 2014

Nicholas Barnes, a 20-year-old junior at the University of Chicago, was found dead in his dorm Feb. 15 after students complained about a smell coming from his room. He had been dead in his dorm room, unnoticed for several days.It had been eight days since Barnes used his university key card to enter his residence hall in the International House dorm. The cause of death is still unknown as of press time, but the Chicago Tribune report...

Editor’s note: Cure our violent society

By Heather Scroering

April 19, 2013

Major incidents, such as 9/11 and the Virginia Tech and Columbine shootings, seemed to be isolated tragedies, but headlines in the last year have been getting increasingly more grim with this string of events: Chardon, Ohio high school shooting, Feb. 27, 2012; Aurora, Colo. shooting, July 20, 2012; Newtown, Conn. Sandy Hook Elementary school shooting, Dec. 14, 2012; Houston, Texas college stabbing, April 9; Boston Marathon...

Mental health closings displace patients

By Managing Editor

November 19, 2012

An estimated 484 mental health patients have gone missing since the city consolidated 12 publicly funded mental health clinics into six facilities in April, according to a recent report.The report, published Oct. 24 by AFSCME Council 31, the union representing the city’s mental health employees, shows that 5,337 patients were being treated by the city-operated clinics before the closings. By July, the Chicago Department ...

Rallying against mayor’s plan to close mental health facilities

By Kaley Fowler

April 16, 2012

As budgetary concerns prompt the city to cut back on public services, a coalition of mental health activists are condemning Mayor Rahm Emanuel for his proposal to close six of the city’s 12 mental health facilities by the end of the month.Southside Together Organizing for Power, a community organization fighting for racial and economic justice on the South Side, and the Mental Health Movement, a branch of STOP, came toget...

Barriers as suicide prevention wouldn’t work at Columbia

By Editorial Board

April 9, 2012

Mental health is an important concern at any college or university. In the last decade, reaching out to troubled students has become even more pressing in the wake of recent campus shootings and a few well-publicized suicides across the nation. Even Columbia has had its fair share of less-publicized suicide scares, especially at residence halls. Some researchers are coming forward to advocate “means restriction,” a suicide...

Hepatitis C vaccine on horizon

By Emily Fasold

April 2, 2012

Researchers at the University of Alberta have come one step closer to developing a preventative vaccine against all major strains of the hepatitis C virus, an accomplishment that was considered impossible until recently.The research was led by Michael Houghton, a virology professor at the university who discovered the virus in 1989. He and his colleagues tested the vaccine on 60 people and found that many made cross-neutr...

Iraqi novelist visits Columbia

By Dannis Valera

February 23, 2012

In collaboration with the Journalism and Fiction Writing departments, as well as Critical Encounters, Iraqi novelist Mahmoud Saeed came to talk about his latest novel; The World Through the Eyes of Angels. Mary Schmich, a columnist for the Chicago Tribune, interviewed him about being a writer under Saddam Hussein's dictatorship and how he ended up here in Chicago.http://youtu.be/lBiPJ-I_yoc...

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