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Chicago’s first cat cafe to come, not without obstacles

Chicago’s first cat cafe to come, not without obstacles

April 6, 2015

Leave your kittens at home—the very first Chicago cat cafe is being built in Rogers Park at 7225 N. Western Ave., where customers can enjoy a latte with Tree House Humane Society’s friendly felines....

Religious freedom laws not free

By Editorial Board

April 6, 2015

Corporate personhood, a doctrine that grants businesses the same rights as U.S. citizens, has existed in the U.S. in some shape or form since before the Civil War. The freedoms a business is allowed have only grown and strengthened with several Supreme Court cases—most recently and particularly Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, a decision that gifted corporations with religious freedom—backing up the idea that corporations have t...

Chicago ladies redefine arm ‘rasslin’: The city’s League of Lady Arm Wrestlers gears up for XXI: My Bloody Valentine

Chicago ladies redefine arm ‘rasslin’: The city’s League of Lady Arm Wrestlers gears up for XXI: My Bloody Valentine

February 9, 2015

Wrestling and theater have gone together since almost the beginning, whether wrestling fans want to admit it or not. Lights, pyrotechnics and theme songs often accompany wrestlers making dramatic entr...

Army regulation revisions too little, too late

By Associate Editor

November 14, 2014

When reading classic American novels such as “Huckleberry Finn” or copies of the Jim Crow laws, readers are bound to encounter prejudice and racial slurs because they were common in the past. But such language and discrimination have no place in contemporary speech, especially when it comes to U.S. military service members of color who risk their lives for the country.The U.S. Army has recently come under fire for its contro...

Redefine alumni relations, that might inspire greatness

By Tyler Eagle

September 8, 2014

A facet of post-grad life I have always been fascinated with is the relationship students have with their colleges after they have their diplomas in hand. At Columbia, I have had the good fortune of meeting entrepreneurial and inspiring alums, many of whom are excited to interact with students at their alma mater. They exemplify the greatest parts of the institution and are testaments to our equally talented faculty. On ...

Elect candidates on policies, not just personalities

By Opinions Editor

March 17, 2014

Politics are just as much about gaining public favor as promoting good policies. But so many politicians have pitched to the public by using the marginalized minority group appeal that it has clouded the water—Americans often vote for politicians based on who they are as representations of  some unique characteristic, like the first tattooed congressman or something equally specific.Fox News commentator Bill O’Reilly d...

Transitioning Transfers to Columbia

By Ivana Hester

December 10, 2012

The rising cost of higher education has many students searching for affordable alternatives, such as attending community college to complete general education classes before transferring to a four-year institution.To attract these transfer students, Columbia launched an initiative at the beginning of the year to make transfer students’ transition more seamless and create a more transfer-friendly community, according to Keri Walter...

Senate investigation finds anti-terrorism hubs fail to protect privacy

By Kaley Fowler

October 14, 2012

The federal government’s funding of fusion centers—hubs for law enforcement agencies to investigate suspected terrorism activity—is under scrutiny after a two-year investigation led by the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations.The investigation, initiated by Sen. Tom Coburn (R–Okla.), examined the effectiveness of the centers, which were implemented after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks to enable local and ...

Proposed gun registration law is far-fetched

By Editorial Board

February 20, 2012

Mayor Rahm Emanuel proposed a statewide gun registry law Feb. 9 that would require handgun owners to register their firearm with the state and pay a fee of $65 for each weapon. Supposedly, the law would help police track down suspects in violent crimes and combat illegal firearm trafficking in Chicago.While a law that could help curb violence and crime as drastically as this one sounds like a great idea, Emanuel’s plan is...

Ida B. Wells monument to come to Bronzeville

By Amanda Murphy

November 21, 2011

Memorials to celebrated historic figures are sprinkled throughout Chicago, reminding passersby of those who helped build the city as it stands today. Like the statues in Grant Park, they celebrate the past and assist Chicagoans in remembering their roots and the important individuals who made their mark on the city’s history.One of these figures, Ida B. Wells, will soon be added to that list.The Ida B. Wells Commemorative A...

Change creates commotion

By Heather Scroering

September 18, 2011

The teams that will manage the college’s prioritization process and its timetable were announced at a town hall meeting on Sept. 15 led by President Warrick Carter and Anne Foley, vice president of Planning and Compliance and project manager of the prioritization process.According to the timetable presented at the meeting, final decisions about programs that might be cut will take place during March and April of 2012. This ...

Alleged system of torture faces its days in court

By Patrick Smith

April 11, 2010

In the coming months, two different court cases, one civil and the other criminal, will bring to trial former Chicago Police Cmdr. Jon Burge, and those under his command, for 19 years of alleged abuse of suspected criminals and of the justice system itself.Burge was fired by the Chicago Police Department in 1993 because of the alleged torture of suspects while he was commander of the police department’s areas 2 and 3. A...

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