The Columbia Chronicle

Common Ground, Columbia’s LGBTQ student group, advocated for preferred first name changes, which lets student change their first names on student IDs, email addresses and other college documents.

College adopts new gender-inclusive policies

April 28, 2014

After a year of outcry from LGBTQ students, administrators have finalized policies for gender-inclusive housing and preferred first name changes. As of Feb. 11, students can request to change their first name on Oasis, which will officially change their first initial on their email...

NCAA Challenged

Ihmoud's Moods

By Media Relations Editor

February 3, 2014

I'm all for challenging the status quo, but college athletes are in for an uphill battle that’ll only get steeper as they begin to fight for representation.ESPN’s “Outside The Lines”first reported ...

Minority voters could impact 2012 election

By Kaley Fowler

October 15, 2012

The minority population could have a majority impact in determining the winner of the 2012 presidential election.According to Sarah Massey, spokeswoman for the nonpartisan voter advocacy website ProjectVote.org, the vote of minority citizens in swing states could potentially turn the tide of the popular vote despite the electorate’s predominately white make up.“In certain states like Ohio or New Mexico, which are considered ...

Black theater provokes change

By Emily Ornberg

September 4, 2012

A gunshot hits Sgt. Vernon Waters of the South’s segregated black military, and he enigmatically cries his last words, “They still hate you!” as he falls to his death.When the lights dimmed and the curtains came down, the cast rejoiced backstage after another performance of “A Soldier’s Play” at Hidden Stages Theater Company. The year was in 1994.Afterward, stage manager Vincent Williams sat distraught in his ap...

Journalists tell ‘Red Tails’

By Contributing Writer

March 5, 2012

by Tyler McDermottContributing WriterThe famed Tuskegee Airmen, a group of African-American fighter pilots who fought with distinction in World War II, epitomized the segregation that existed in the U.S. armed services. Depicted in “Red Tails”—the 2012 film directed by Anthony Hemingway and written by John Ridley and Aaron McGruder—the Airmen show what it means to be an African-American in warefare.The Columbia Colle...

Black Heritage Month Celebrated

By Contributing Writer

February 13, 2012

by Tyler McDermott, Contributing WriterColumbia’s Office of Multicultural Affairs kicked off African-American Heritage Month Feb. 1 with a reception to mark the approaching close of its long-running art exhibit “Black Gossamer,” though the exhibit did not formally shut down until Feb. 11.The exhibit, which premiered in November 2011 at the Glass Curtain Gallery in the Conway Center, 1104 S. Wabash Ave., celebrated African-American and Caribbean culture, featuring artwork and installations from world-renowned artists such as Myra Greene and Ebony G. Patterson.Guests at the reception were invited to enjoy a light dinner and peruse the gallery before listening to a lecture on the connection between art and fashion by Afro-futurist artist and Columbia faculty member D. Denenge Akpem.Those who attended the closing ceremony said they were looking forward to what Columbia and the Office of Multicultural Affairs will offer for the remaining weeks of African-American Heritage Month.“I can’t wait to see the up-and-coming events that are going on for this month,” said Emmanuel Bansa, senior Film and Video student. “I feel like they’re going to be very fruitful. It’s a great start.”Kimberley Weatherly, director of African-American Cultural Affairs, promised there will be many more events from Multicultural Affairs this month.“We try to invite guests who speak to our mission and [our] different academic departments, since we’re [a] fine, visual, and performing arts [college],” Weatherly said. “We will just get different people to cover the different majors. So you may have someone one year from theatre, film, television and radio. The next year we may be fortunate to get someone from animation and design, or journalism.”Columbia emphasized its inclusiveness Feb. 2 when the Office of African-American Cultural Affairs teamed up with the Office of Asian-American Cultural Affairs to host a “Lunar New Year Celebration” featuring celebrity vegan chef Bryant Terry.“We try to add something new every year,” Weatherly said. “This year, we did something different with Lunar New Year. We try to collaborate with different departments because it’s important that we not only celebrate our culture, but other people are able to celebrate as well.”R & B songstress Angie Stone, writer Sam Greenlee, journalist Mary Mitchell and many more will be hitting the campus in the coming weeks.“It’s not about, ‘You’re not black any other month,’” Weatherly said. “It’s an opportunity for people to really focus in and learn history, and for the majority to celebrate all the different cultures [and] focus on what we have and be thankful, and to expose people to another culture.”Upcoming African-American heritage events: Cultural Journey: Mary Mitchell, Journalist from Chicago Sun-Times. Tuesday, Feb. 15; Afro Blue: Blowout, Feb. 21; From Colonial to National Times: Spooks, Censors; and Sam Greenlee: The Spook who sat by the Door, Feb. 23; An Afternoon with Neo-Soul Artist Angie Stone, Feb. 28; Black Like Us: Celebrating Our Musical Heritage, Feb. 29. For locations, times and additional events, visit the event listings at Colum.edu.

Keep smoking ban mostly in place

By Editorial Board

March 28, 2011

The Executive Committee of the Illinois House approved two bills on March 9 that would amend the state’s indoor smoking ban, which was enacted in 2008. One bill would allow smoking in separated rooms in Illinois casinos, and the other would allow local governments to issue smoking licenses to bars, adult entertainment establishments and private clubs.Proponents of the casino bill claim Illinois casinos are losing revenue...

Celebrating Black Culture in Chicago

By Luke Wilusz

February 22, 2010

Carter G. Woodson was a passionate man and devoted historian who felt that his race was misrepresented in the pages of history. Instead of letting that injustice stand, he decided to do something about it, and the month of February hasn’t been the same since.Woodson founded the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History in Chicago in 1915. In 1926, the association chose a week in February to celebrate N...

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