The Chronicle

Invisible identities: Gay-washing and other bisexual issues

By Managing Editor

February 9, 2015

When Massachusetts became the first state in the U.S. to legalize same-sex marriage in 2004, renowned bisexual activist Robyn Ochs and her partner, Peg Preble, were more than ready to take their long-awaited walk down the aisle. After spending seven years together, the two women were happy to have a legally recognized marriage. But one problem arose after the ceremony—notable media outlets, including The Washington ...

Tape collectors keepin’ it reel

By Arts & Culture Reporter

January 26, 2015

Walking into a local thrift shop, a casual shopper may pass an old cassette player and a stack of tapes and think nothing of it. In 1975, when boomboxes featuring cassette decks were introduced to U.S. consumers, the cassette became the go-to source for portable music listening until being all but completely phased out by CDs in the mid-’80s. Although still a popular medium for alternative music junkies, it seems like the cassette...

Large assets, bigger profits: Plus-size women, clothing, bloggers, fight to fit into the fashion industry

By Managing Editor

December 8, 2014

The highest-earning plus-size supermodel in the fashion industry is known by one name—not her first or last, just “Emme.” The 51-year-old made her way into the fashion industry in the 1990s, when ultra-thin airbrushed models graced the covers of fashion magazines, advertisements and runways. Although the experience was exciting for Emme, she was not immune to prejudice: a famous photographer referred to her as a “fatty...

Can Columbia keep gaming’s sexism out of the classroom?

By Features Editor

December 1, 2014

Amanda Hamrick addressed the panel at the Nov. 12 Columbia College Assembly matter-of-factly. As student senator from the Interactive Arts & Media Department, she wanted to know what the college was doing to prepare female students in gaming for the gender discrimination they are likely to experience in the historically male-dominated industry.The panel, which included Vice President of Student Success, Mark Kelly, and dis...

Hampton’s death not quite forgotten: 45th anniversary of the death of Illinois Black Panther Party Chairman Fred Hampton calls the party’s legacy into question

Hampton’s death not quite forgotten: 45th anniversary of the death of Illinois Black Panther Party Chairman Fred Hampton calls the party’s legacy into question

By Arts & Culture Editor

November 24, 2014

On the dark winter morning of Dec. 4, 1969, 14 Chicago Police Department officers gathered outside the West Side apartment of 21-year-old Illinois Black Panther Party Chairman Fred Hampton. Officers sto...

‘One century minus a baker’s dozen:’ Finding the forest for the trees in the translation of literature

‘One century minus a baker’s dozen:’ Finding the forest for the trees in the translation of literature

November 17, 2014

“Fourscore and seven years ago” is a phrase every American knows. Abraham Lincoln began his Gettysburg Address to a war-weary crowd of Pennsylvanians with those five words on a Thursday afternoon in Novembe...

Saving Chicago’s Youth: In the aftermath of tragic losses, communities create alternative approaches to gang intervention

Saving Chicago’s Youth: In the aftermath of tragic losses, communities create alternative approaches to gang intervention

November 10, 2014

Wearing a suit jacket, slacks and a blue tie with yellow stripes, Ronald Holt, commander of the Chicago Police Department’s Special Activities Unit, looks like a normal businessman or typical high-r...

Surviving the big pay off

By Maria Castellucci & Matt McCall Opinions Editor & Features Editor

October 27, 2014

Russell Harrison might never have paid off his student loans if he hadn’t had his debt consolidated.Upon graduating in 2008 from Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida, after receiving a bachelor’s of arts in music composition, he owed $40,000–50,000 in private and federal student loans. At the time, he was working at 7-Eleven and a Millworks furniture construction factory, operating heavy machinery. He worked mornings an...

Pediatric medicine’s damaging oversight

Pediatric medicine’s damaging oversight

October 13, 2014

In 1889, pediatric surgeon William Hill was removing the tonsils from children with obstructed airways to alleviate their struggles with breathing when he noticed unforeseen side effects of the procedure. T...

Back to basics

By Features Editor

September 29, 2014

When CBS tweeted, “Stephen Colbert to be next host of ‘The Late Show’” in April, it was a bittersweet moment for fans. The wry comedic powerhouse will shift to CBS from his long-time home on Comedy Central in 2015, but something will be lost in the process: Stephen Colbert, the character. The bombastic, conservative pundit who started as a correspondent on “The Daily Show” in 1997 and hosted the Emmy Award-wi...

Pulling at the seams: Uptown’s decades-long heritage of diversity beginning to crumble

By Copy Chief

September 22, 2014

“Hey, man, can I have a smoke?”Startled from his private thoughts, Tobias Elder tried to keep walking past the man who asked him for a cigarette. The man looked like he could be a gang member, Elder says, and Elder was not in the mood to barter over cigarettes, so he tossed him the whole pack and tried to move on.To his surprise, the man followed him and looped an arm across his shoulders, asking what was wrong. When ...

Can’t Live With ‘Em, Can’t Live Without ‘Em

Can’t Live With ‘Em, Can’t Live Without ‘Em

September 15, 2014

There is almost no limit to Lakeview-native Michael Mayor’s devotion to the Cubs. He endured his wife’s wrath for waking his two eldest sons—then ages 5 and 4—on the night of Oct. 14, 2003, ...

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