The Columbia Chronicle

Lerman’s future in question

By BenitaZepeda

October 19, 2009

Mystery surrounds the status of Zafra Lerman, longtime head of Columbia’s Institute for Science Education and Science Communication, as an unverified report circulated on campus last week that the internationally known chemist and teacher is no longer employed by the school.No one in the college administration would discuss the matter with The Chronicle,  even to directly address the question of whether or not she still w...

Event attempts to reform environment laws

By LauraNalin

October 19, 2009

Columbia’s recycling program will participate in an international campaign focusing on possible solutions to the current climate crisis on Oct. 24, the International Day of Climate Change.The organization has worked dilligently throughout the years to make sure the campus has adequate recycling bins for both paper and plastic and has been planning this event for quite some time. The Chicago event will be held in the Cona...

Award-winning author, professor shares his success

By LauraNalin

October 19, 2009

Once a month, The Chronicle profiles people on campus who are doing interesting or important things.We’re always watching for faculty, staff and students with a story to tell. Here’s someone you should know.Fiction writing professor and award-winning author Joe Meno has written five novels, two short stories and still finds time to spend with his family.  Meno, who earned both his undergraduate and graduate degrees fro...

Three departments team up for Creative Nonfiction Week

By CiaraShook

October 19, 2009

Pulitzer Prize finalist and local Chicago writer Luis Alberto Urrea will speak to students, faculty, staff and the public for Columbia’s ninth annual Creative Nonfiction Week.Creative Nonfiction Week will have various activities and events that stress the importance and relevance of the broad literature genre  in a modern society.Creative Nonfiction Week, Oct. 19 - 23, will feature lectures, conversations and readings by faculty members and students, as well as guests such as Urrea, Laurie Lindeen, Chris Rose and John D’Agata.Sam Weller, assistant fiction writing professor and project coordinator of Creative Nonfiction Week, said the week is a unique collaboration among the English, Fiction Writing and Journalism Departments.“It’s a cool example of how three departments can team up to make an event better for all of our students, which at the end of the day is our goal here,” Weller said.Weller joined forces with Jenny Boully of the English Department and Teresa Puente of the Journalism Department to organize the weeklong event.Weller said that from his perspective in the Fiction Writing Department, Creative Nonfiction Week shows that the bedrock of creative nonfiction is storytelling and those techniques extend from the fiction writer, novelist and the short-story writer.“As a professor in [fiction writing], I want to make those connections for my students,” Weller said.Boully said creative nonfiction is becoming popular again because more interesting nonfiction books and essays are being published.“It’s now becoming sexier and has been getting more attention,” Boully said. “I think that’s in large part to the more interesting nonfiction books and essays that are being published.”Puente said a lot of writing forms fit in the creative nonfiction genre, such as the personal essay, travel writing, blogging and memoirs.“There are so many different styles of writing and sometimes it’s hard to define them as just one,” Puente said. “[Creative Nonfiction Week] is a phenomenal opportunity for students to hear some of the best creative nonfiction writers in the country.”Urrea, who will give a keynote speech the evening of Oct. 19, has published books about border and immigration issues including Nobody’s Son: Notes from an American Life and The Devil’s Highway: A True Story.“At a time when immigration is such an important issue in this country, we thought that he would be a really good speaker to highlight this year,” Puente said.The Journalism Department will bring in Chris Rose, a columnist for the New Orleans Times-Picayune newspaper. He is one of the leading voices on the American tragedy of Hurricane Katrina, Weller said.The Fiction Writing Department welcomes memoirist Laurie Lindeen, who released Petal Pusher: A Rock and Roll Cinderella Story in 2007, which is about the Twin Cities’ alternative music scene of the 1980s.John D’Agata, a writer who has recreated the essay in relationship to poetry, comes to Columbia for the English portion of Creative Nonfiction Week.“He’s a leading voice in terms of the future of the American essay as it were,” Weller said. D’Agata will speak in the Ferguson Auditorium of the Alexandroff Campus Center, 600 S. Michigan Ave., Oct. 22 at 6:30 p.m.Student and faculty writers will be giving readings for Creative Nonfiction Week. The student readings are Oct. 19 at 3:30 p.m. and include writers Nicole Faust, Sophia Ulmer, Kristen Fiore, Jon Gugala, Lisa Cisneros and Thomas Pardee. The faculty readings are Oct. 21 at 3:30 p.m. and include writers Aviya Kushner, Lisa Schlesinger and Yolanda Joe.A closing reception and readings from South Loop Review: Creative Nonfiction will be Oct. 23 at 3:30 p.m. in the Quincy Wong Center for Artistic Expression on the first floor of the Wabash Campus Building, 623 S. Wabash Ave.Most Creative Nonfiction events will be held in Film Row Cinema, located on the eighth floor of the Conaway Center at 1104 S. Wabash Ave., unless otherwise mentioned.

Annual exhibit finds new home

By LauraNalin

October 19, 2009

The Portfolio Center debuted this year’s annual Albert P. Weisman exhibit in The Arcade, the college’s new gallery, located in the 618 S. Michigan Ave. building on the second floor.The exhibition,  which was held on Oct. 12, has been a Columbia tradition for the past 35 years, and is an opportunity for undergraduate and recent alumni to showcase their work from October through December.  Weisman applicants submit their e...

Activists gather to oppose war violence

By LauraNalin

October 12, 2009

Students, activists and faculty gathered at a symbolic “die-in” on Oct. 7 to commemorate civilian lives lost in Afghanistan over the past eight years during the U.S. occupancy. The participants of the event volunteered to emulate dying by lying on the ground, giving the public a visual of the casualties that have taken place.Andy Keil/THE CHRONICLEThe volunteers were given white sheets to cover themselves as students read an...

Haunting Mexican folklore comes to life in lecture

By BenitaZepeda

October 12, 2009

Each culture has unique stories that are passed down orally from generation to generation. In Mexican culture, one story that is often interpreted many different ways is the story of La Llorona:The Weeping Woman.“La Llorona: The Weeping Woman: The Sixth Portent, The Third Legend,” was hosted by the Cultural Studies Program and the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs on Oct. 7.  This was the first lecture of Intersections...

Flying is believing

By The Columbia Chronicle

October 12, 2009

The battle between fact and faith is present in any human’s mind. Now and then, we all doubt faith because of fact and we may even deny the facts when they conflict with our faith. Both facts and faith are learned throughout our lives. There is no such thing as a “built in” conception of fact and faith. We learn our faith through our family and friends, while our knowledge of facts develops with life experience and ed...

Multicultural Affairs to host fashion show

By CiaraShook

October 12, 2009

Multicultural Affairs will present “Kaleidoscope,” their second fashion show fundraiser, which will showcase designs from around the world this Friday.“Kaleidoscope” will show Columbia’s diverse cultures by featuring unique fashions from around campus and as far away as Tokyo.  All of the proceeds from this event will go to Chicago Cultural Alliance,  a nonprofit consortium working to build an understanding of c...

Columbia faculty, students remember Carol Ann Stowe

By LauraNalin

October 12, 2009

Carol Ann Stowe was an innovative, one-of-a-kind leader of the Early Childhood Education program at Columbia for the past 16 years. Considered by her family to be a devoted mother and exceptional teacher, her colleagues refer to her as the “matriarch” of their tight-knit working community.Stowe died Sunday, Oct. 4 at the age of 57. She is survived by her husband, who was her high school sweetheart, three daughters and t...

College lawsuit pending

By BenitaZepeda

October 12, 2009

On Oct. 5, former Columbia faculty member Suriyha H. Smiley filed a civil lawsuit against the college after she was terminated for allegedly making an anti-Semitic comment to astudent.  She alleges the college subjected her to racial discrimination, which ledto her termination.Smiley, who was a part-time faculty member in the Radio Department for more than 14 years, allegedly told one of her students, “I should have kn...

Twitter co-founder speaks to Columbia

By Colin Shively

October 12, 2009

In the dimly-lit room of Film Row Cinema at the 1104 Center, 1104 S. Wabash Ave., the silhouttes of 300-plus guests sat in chairs facing the stage. As the lights came on, a few faces were lit by cell phones as they quickly sent a message on Twitter. As Columbia President Warrick L. Carter stood up, the room went silent as he introduced the evening’s guest speaker—Biz Stone, the co-founder of the popular micro-blogging s...

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