The Columbia Chronicle

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Now What?

By Jazzy Davenport

April 20, 2009

The recent closing of Roosevelt's fitness facility sent many of Columbia's faculty, staff and students into an uproar. However, the people who utilized the fitness facility and gym the most, Columbia's athletes and coaches, do not seem quite as concerned-for the time being."As of right now, most of our athletic teams are outside playing and practicing, so it really hasn't affected us right now, but come fall, we're going to...

Manifest taps into texting

By Kaiti Deerberg

April 20, 2009

Creators of a new text messaging program developed by the Marketing Communication Department are looking to make Manifest more maneuverable for students and festival-goers come May 15.ManiTXT, a program that will continually update users about events and places to find free giveaways in real time during Manifest, will allow users to opt in or out of the service at any time.  Users simply will have to text message the word "...

Criminal creative expression on the rise

Criminal creative expression on the rise

April 13, 2009

A short walk down South Wabash Avenue on Columbia’s campus is enough to see a growing trend of vandalism. Dozens of graffiti tags and stickers litter the sides of buildings, signs, mailboxes and sidewalks, creating enough of...

VIDEO: 10 questions for The Plastic Soy Sauce

April 13, 2009

Formed by four Japanese students at Columbia College Chicago, rock band The Plastic Soy Sauce has played at the International Fair hosted by the International Student Organization (ISO) of Columbia ...

Any takers?

Any takers?

April 13, 2009

Election week for the Student Government Association is fast approaching, and the organization is worried about low turnouts and a shortage of candidates after a disappointing election last semester. The result? Many of Colum...

Asian student organization struggles without coordinator

By Jazzy Davenport

April 13, 2009

Members of Columbia’s Asian Student Organization are no strangers to the feeling of invisibility. The light at the end of the tunnel seems unreachable, and the task they’ve encountered unbearable. With the recent departure of their coordinator, members of ASO were left with limited resources and minimal support, but many already scheduled events.ASO, an organization that had been inactive until 2 years ago, currently has about...

Chemistry of finding yourself

Chemistry of finding yourself

April 13, 2009

While working as a chemist in so-called “corporate America,” Gianina Lockley had a breakthrough. Though she studied for several years to earn a degree in chemistry, she started to have second th...

Reaccreditation leads to revitalization

By Jazzy Davenport

April 6, 2009

The Higher Learning Commission came to Columbia and put the administration to the test last week to confirm or deny the school's reaccreditation, a process that happens once every 10 years.Eight representatives from the HLC were on campus for two days hosting forums, asking students questions and talking to faculty to suggest improvements and see if Columbia has been following through on its mission statement. Columbia had already su...

New major proposed, will link science, art

By Lauren Kelly

April 6, 2009

A new major may be offered at Columbia if approved at the College Council meeting on May 1. An undergraduate degree in Art Conservation, offered through the Science and Mathematics Department, may become the third undergraduate program in the country offering a degree in conservation.The major would combine many science and mathematics classes with fine arts, forging a new connection between the departments. The proposal was annou...

Literary event fires up passion for books

By Lauren Kelly

April 6, 2009

Over the next six weeks, Columbia will host events focusing on Ray Bradbury's classic novel Fahrenheit 451 as part of The Big Read, the largest literary initiative in United States history. The celebration is a nationwide event produced by the National Endowment for the Arts, with more than 200 participating communities."The Big Read aims to address directly the issue of a critical decline in reading for pleasure among American ...

More aid on the horizon

By Katherine Kaye

April 6, 2009

With the start of the college’s new initiative, Scholarship Columbia, and an increase in the scholarship fund, new aid is definitely on the horizon for Columbia students.Among the things set for change in the coming year is an anticipated 46 percent increase in the scholarship fund for Columbia and its new program, Scholarship Columbia.Since beginning the effort to raise $1 million in aid for Scholarship Columbia, the Office of Institutional Advancement has received $200,000 in pledges and cash that have been committed to the program. Outside of the program, Dr. Eric Winston, vice president of Institutional Advancement, said that scholarship funding is the first priority of his office."Not only are we engaged in Scholarship Columbia, but when we are out trying to seek dollars for Columbia College across the whole spectrum of needs of Columbia, scholarships are always our first request because we know how important they are," Winston said.The Office of Institutional Advancement’s objective is to raise funds for Columbia in general. The Office raised $13 million in funding last year, a record high for the department, but there is a push to raise scholarship money right now.Winston said that most of the donors like giving to the college’s scholarship fund and request that the students get the money right away. His office goes to corporations, foundations and individuals to pitch scholarship funding, but the most difficult group to raise money from is Columbia alumni."The reason for that is that Columbia College, historically, never provided support for students, you paid your money and you came here," Winston said.Because of this, many alumni haveturned down requests for funding and feel as though Columbia students should be financially independent like they once were.“When I’ve talked to Columbia alumni about giving to Columbia for scholarships, I’ve had people say very bluntly, ‘No, I’m not going to do that because nobody helped me when I was in school …  they should get a job like I did,’” Winston said.He thinks it is just a situation that Columbia will have to overcome because those students were not helped with their schooling. For every alumnus who feels that way, there are one or two who are willing to help, he said.In terms of who is sought out as a donor, the office has a “very sophisticated process of screening people,” Winston said.“One of the first things that we did when I came on board was create a cadre of alumni volunteers, and we are always asking them to tell us about new alumni,” Winston said.There are several chapters of volunteers in various states who communicate regularly with Winston’s staff about new alumni to approach for scholarship donations. The department also monitors and reads newspapers to scan for important people in the arts community.“If somebody is a big person in the arts or interested in the arts, they would be a great candidate to be associated with Columbia,” Winston said. “We use all of the vehicles and events that we have to try and get them to the campus and get to know them.”The Office of Student Affairs is also involved in the scholarship process and plays a role in promoting Scholarship Columbia.“What we hope is that for next year there will be a minimum of $400,000 of additional scholarships coming from this initiative,” said Mark Kelly, vice president of Student Affairs.With the new increase in the budget for the scholarship fund, Kelly talked of plans to increase the number of students on scholarships at Columbia.“Through institutional scholarships, about 1,700 students are receiving scholarships this academic year; next year that’ll increase to 2,300 students,” Kelly said. “We would hope to continue to build on that.”With this year’s budget, he said the college still focused on what was important.“I think it’s fair to say that for this coming budget year, the No. 1 priority was scholarships,” Kelly said.Emma Larsson, a senior graphic design major, came to Columbia two years ago as a transfer student with a 3.8 GPA. She applied for two Columbia in-house scholarships, the Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship and the Transfer Student Scholarship, both based on academic achievement.“If you’re not in a financial bind and you are a junior or senior, there’s nothing for you,” Larsson said. “It was very frustrating.”She said Scholarship Columbia is a good idea but felt it could have been beneficial when she first came to Columbia.“I would want to support Columbia in some way, be it scholarships or something else,” Larsson said.“They should offer a scholarship for people working X amount of hours and still have 15-plus credit hours.”For more information, on Scholarship Columbia or other scholarships, visit Colum.edu/Scholarships.

Empty space full of ‘Manifest’-ing ideas

By Timothy Bearden

March 30, 2009

Manifest exhibits will temporarily fill the empty space left by the Writing Center's move from the 33 E. Congress Parkway Building, but budget constraints have left the room without a permanent occupant.Administrators at Columbia have been debating whether to move the bookstore to the space that has been empty since the Writing Center was moved into the 618 Building, 618 S. Michigan Ave., at the beginning of spring semeste...

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