The Chronicle

Ready, set…sell

Ready, set…sell

October 13, 2008

Columbia's latest effort to showcase student work is set to launch this week in the form of an on-campus store, which will be open to the public and serve to earn both the college and artists some extra cash. ShopColumbia, ...

Kerouac’s beat goes on at Columbia

By Kaiti Deerberg

October 13, 2008

Filed under Campus

Jack Kerouac's original On the Road manuscript has made its latest stop at Columbia and inspired staff and students to celebrate the Beats' legacy.The famous manuscript was written by Kerouac on a 120-foot scroll during a three-week period in 1951. Kerouac was an original member of the group of artists known as "The Beats," including Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs and Neal Cassady, who explored alternative writing styles ...

President Carter leads Columbia into 2012

President Carter leads Columbia into 2012

By Timothy Bearden, Staff Reporter

October 13, 2008

Filed under Campus

Warrick L. Carter, the president of Columbia, agreed to a two-year extension on his 2010 contract at the board of trustees meeting on Oct. 2. Carter has been with the college since 2000 and under his leadership, the college has not only i...

Natural Tendencies: Critical Encounters’ personal narratives on Human/Nature

By The Columbia Chronicle

October 13, 2008

Filed under Campus

by Maggie KastFaculty, English DepartmentImagine an island 23 miles long and nine miles wide. Everything that doesn't come from the sea or the island's small patch of land must be hauled in by truck and ferry. You see long lines of refrigerated semi-trucks rumbling off the dock each morning, bringing supplies to a population that swells from 15,000 to 100,000 each summer. And there's no place for bottles and cans to go but into a landfill or back on the ferry.An early 17th century English sailor sees the island's profusion of wild grapevines and names it for his daughter, Martha. A few years later, English colonists claim the land from Wampanoag Indians. Two centuries later, it's a whaling center, bustling with Portuguese-speaking seamen from the Azores and Cape Verde Islands. A Methodist preacher arrives, holds a revival and camp tents become cottages surrounding a tabernacle. The early 20th century brings African American artists, politicians and educators, seasoning the mix of Puritan sheep farmers and fishermen with sun- and sea-loving summer people. Despite long, hard winters and crowded summers, everybody gets along.I joined those off-island visitors last July and rented a 100-year-old ramshackle beach cottage in the town of Oak Bluffs, Mass., big enough for all my children and step-children, their children, my sister and friends. Fifteen people gathered around a huge table for dinner each night. We hadn't all been together for 20 years; some had never even met each other's wives or children.The first day, three of us rode bikes along a gorgeous path between ocean sound and marshy nesting grounds, past banks of clover, goldenrod, cattails and beach plum. Near Edgartown, we stumbled upon a farm stand selling island-grown produce: lettuce, tomatoes, beans, zucchini, melons, basil and chives, food that had never seen a truck or a ferry. There were jars of beach plum jam and Portuguese sweet bread, not a confection but a faintly sweet and chewy loaf.We loaded up. That evening our vegetarians made Indian-style curried cauliflower and potatoes and soups of leek, potato and zucchini. My sister made tofu and chicken kebabs with Portuguese bread threaded between the vegetables, and my daughter made a three-bean salad. Our omnivores fired up the grill for beef as well as veggie burgers made of bulgur, beans and nuts."Those carbon deposits on grilled food cause cancer," said my oldest stepson, a physician."Your wife and kids avoid it too?" I asked."Only when I'm looking," he said as he boiled some steak in oil, then finished it in the microwave.People flowed like breezes around the unlocked house, sitting on the porch, forming groups for talks or walks or rides, getting to know the strangers who shared their genes. Everybody got along."What happened to my washcloth?" called my sister from upstairs one morning. The washing machine rumbled, and everyone shrugged, sleepy over coffee in the kitchen."The towels are gone too," said my daughter, getting up."Some people hang their towels to dry," said the doctor's wife. "We use them once and throw them on the floor."Eyebrows rose, and we nodded comprehension. It seems the doc had swept the house of towels and put them in to wash. Our dissonant family cultures clashed and blended, while the moist, salt breezes, broad sounds and shell-filled beaches softened the edges of our difference. The women swam and read, teens hung out in town and the men played timed chess.Each evening we gathered to drink beer or wine and cook. Day by day the clinking pile of bottles grew. Each time someone left, they took a bagful to the ferry, imagining an island that would never be used up.

Upstairs exhibit a boost for photo rookies

Upstairs exhibit a boost for photo rookies

October 13, 2008

While most exhibits on campus display work created by upperclassmen, the Photography Department is tipping its hat to the up-and-comers as well. The hallways on the 10th floor of the Alexandroff Campus Center, 600 S. Michiga...

Second act

By The Columbia Chronicle

October 6, 2008

Filed under Campus

by Kevin FullerFaculty, Science and Math DepartmentIf it is true that we are the product of our experiences, then the banks of a small Georgia lake are a big part of me. I spent the better part of my summer days there fishing, swimming (not on game days), canoeing, catching turtles-and avoiding poisonous snakes. It was an idyllic childhood that I cherish, but understand that few would enjoy it. The lake was about two miles ...

Carter outlines ‘core values’ for trustees

By Thomas Pardee

October 6, 2008

Filed under Campus

Columbia president Warrick L. Carter delivered his quarterly president's address to the Board of Trustees on Oct. 2, emphasizing what he called the college's "core values."Carter spoke in the University Center's Lake Room, 525 S. State St., to 48 trustees and other event attendees. The trustees attended an "idea hour," consisting of poetry discussions and performance art pieces, before retreating into their closed-door meeti...

SGA to vote on recording device ban

By Timothy Bearden

October 6, 2008

Filed under Campus

Students wanting to record Student Government Association meetings may soon be out of luck.At SGA's Sept. 30 meeting, the association voted on a proposal to ban devices such as video or audio recorders and cameras at regular meetings. Under the new amendment, such devices would not be allowed without approval from a two-thirds majority ruling by the senate."No recording devices of any kind may be used during an [SGA] meet...

Warhol finds new home on campus

By Kaiti Deerberg

October 6, 2008

Filed under Campus

The Museum of Contemporary Photography recently received a generous donation of work from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. MoCP's new Warhol collection is comprised of about 150 polaroids and standard black and white 5x11 silver gelatin prints taken by Warhol in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The donation was acquired this summer, and there is no exhibition in the works as of yet.Rod Slemmons, director of t...

Council announces faculty rankings approval

Council announces faculty rankings approval

October 6, 2008

  At the College Council's first meeting of the academic year on Oct. 3, few decisions were made, but the meeting was filled with college-related announcements. Topping the agenda was news about faculty rankings, the opening ...

Faculty member under college investigation

By Timothy Bearden

September 29, 2008

Filed under Campus

An allegation of derogatory words spoken by a adjunct  faculty member in class prompted an investigation by the Dean of Students.A member in the Arts, Entertainment and Media Management Department allegedly used slurs during the first day of his Introduction to Management course on Sept. 9.Keisha Geter, sophomore marketing communication major  who was in the class, said professor Robert Kolodziej, also a senior accountant i...

Going green

By The Columbia Chronicle

September 29, 2008

Filed under Campus

by John WawrzaszekFaculty, Recycling Program directorLife is a shame sometimes anyway, she thinks. Things come and go-as is the natural order of the world, like seasons. Buildings are constructed in every empty lot of city space. The last tree on her block, squatting in a vacant lot, littered with trash and nestled between two newly constructed condos finally came down during a weekend she was away visiting friends. Things a...

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