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All good things come to an end

By Bethany Reinhart

January 26, 2009

Tucked away on a residential street in Lincoln Park stands a nondescript three-story building filled with 60 years of art history. Bronze sculptures line countertops, brightly colored paintings decorate office walls and life-sized stainless steel sculptures of animals, created from recycled car bumpers, fill the artists' work areas at the Contemporary Art Workshop, 542 W. Grant Place.The community art center and gallery ha...

From finances to frosting

By Bertha Serrano

January 26, 2009

Hidden between large building corporations and attracting the white collar folk, a new cake boutique is making office parties a bit easier.Without needing to make the run for a Jewel-Osco cake, Sugar Bliss Cake Boutique, 115 N. Wabash Ave., opened its doors on Jan. 5. Now proudly sporting her Sugar Bliss Cake apron, owner Teresa Ging left her job as a financial analyst to open her own business."When I was in finance and it ...

Skipping rope to punk rock

By Evan Minsker

January 26, 2009

Walking into a gym full of people skipping rope to a song by The Clash could be a surreal experience. The punk rockers are all playing tag and laughing. Don't be fooled-the world hasn't turned upside-down.Punk Rope, a New York-based company started by personal trainer Tim Haft in 2004, started hosting classes in Chicago on Jan. 14. In each class, students go through an alternative "exercise" routine that combines jump rope...

Check me out:

Check me out:

By Megan Ferringer

January 26, 2009

The phrase “modern grandfather” is used by Columbia journalism faculty member Dan Sinker to describe his style—a look he claims is primarily cardigans and tan pants with a bit of a hipper flair.When Sin...

Finding antiques in ‘Haystack’

By Josh Sambdman

January 26, 2009

Cleverly laid out merchandise catches the eye, while the scent of old clothes intertwines itself with a soundtrack not found during the standard Salvation Army affair. The atmosphere is apparent as soon as a customer walks in the door.As a vintage shop with intricately crafted artistic displays and a healthy dose of eccentric flair, Haystack Vintage, 2934 N. Broadway, has carved a niche for itself among thrifters and bargain an...

ALBUM REVIEW: Animal Collective finds balance with new ‘Merriweather Post Pavilion’

By Josh Sambdman

January 26, 2009

A quick look at the cover of Animal Collective's Merriweather Post Pavilion immediately lets you know what to expect for the next hour of listening. The simplistic design seems to ripple across its surface, while staying completely stationary at the same time. Never before has an album's packaging represented its inner contents so well.Like previous Animal Collective releases, Merriweather Post Pavilion is full of music not ...

Becoming Kris Kringle

By Megan Ferringer

December 8, 2008

For thousands of men across the country, the beginning of December calls for an atypical refashioning of their normal business wardrobes.Just like clockwork, as Dec. 1 hits and twinkle lights are strung on barren trees, these men store away their black slacks and leather loafers for the season. Instead, they pull from the hangers suits made of red velvet. Their white beards are perfectly groomed, and their cheeks are flushed...

Que sera, sera

By Sara Harvey

December 8, 2008

Most of you reading this will have already moved into your new dorm room or apartment. Some of you will have met your new roommate, too. This could be the start of a beautiful friendship-or not.I remember how excited I was when I found out I would be sharing a space with a roommate, my first one ever. I was unpacking my things at the University Center, putting sheets on my bed and hanging up clothes in the closet. A girl walked in with members of her family following her. She was carrying one small box with a pillow in it. It was my new roommate.But before I could say "Go Huskers," she ran out of the room bawling, and I never saw her again. So much for a first roommate.For the first two months of school, I had a high-ceiling suite all to myself. I shared a connecting bathroom with two other gals (hey, Mercedes and Luisa!), but that was it.In late October, I got a note under my door on UC stationery. I'd be getting a new roommate, who I'll call Roomie No. 2 for the sake of this column.The first few weeks after she moved in passed by pretty quietly. She took up more space than I thought she would, though she wasn't around all the time. She had followed her boyfriend to Columbia, and he sometimes stopped by the room so they could go to the cafeteria together.Sharing a room is easy, I thought. No worries here-just make sure you're courteous and friendly, and things will be fine.It wasn't until my suitemates pointed out something green on the wall that I started to wonder about her.I don't mean green paint. I mean snot. Green, dried crust on the wall in the bathroom. It had to be the new girl ... but why would she wipe snot on the walls when there were tissues readily available? Was she drunk, or did we do something offensive?Then, as I was staring at the hard green chunk on the wall, I realized we had.Weeks before, according to my suitemates, Roomie No. 2 frequently returned to the room with her man while I was gone. They fought and made "loud banging noises," though I was never around for the spectacle. There was blood in the bathroom. Suffice it to say my suitemates were freaked out."We have to do something," they said. So we did-we arranged for a mediation and confronted her. Roomie No. 2 was pretty upset about it, I guess, and that explained the booger warfare.It was the beginning of a tumultuous relationship in which I came home to see posters torn from the wall and woke up to Roomie No. 2 and her pal slamming the door at 2 a.m. My friends thought I was crazy to put up with it, but I'm more of a lover than a fighter: I would have loved to put something vile in her John Frieda shampoo or sprinkle itching powder on her sheets.I put up with it until about December, and she was kicked out by the UC for one of her indiscretions. I was afraid about who they might give me next.Someone up there must love me, because I got Monique, the most down-to-earth, laid-back person I'd ever met. She moved in with her Ikea futon, a fridge, a TV, an Xbox, incense and some John Butler Trio albums.I haven't seen Monique since we moved out during the last week of classes. But I learned something crucial: Roommates can help you become more tolerant, diversify your interests and that things can always get much, much worse, but they won't ever stay that way.

All Schnarr All-star

By Steven Schnarr

December 8, 2008

When I was 6 years old, I stole icing out of a jar my mom was saving for a cake. I felt so guilty that I told my mom as soon as she got home. She thanked me for being honest and told me not to do it again. Based on that experience, I realized honesty is the way to go, not only with my family, but with every other relationship, as well.Over the next 16 years, two more rules developed alongside the first-honesty, communication and no ex...

Urbanizing extinct apples

By Bertha Serrano

December 8, 2008

While visions of apple picking in an orchard aren't typically associated with Chicago, a new organization is hoping to add this pastime to the metropolitan area.Chicago Rarities Orchard Project (CROP) is an organization dedicated to preserving rare and endangered fruits in Chicago, and their goal for the next couple of years is to build urban orchards around the city.On Dec. 8, the group's first fundraiser will be held at ...

Tappin’ to the beat of the drum

By Bertha Serrano

December 8, 2008

Ballet and Tchaikovsky's compositions might not be the most exciting things in this world, so a local dance instructor decided to mix the traditional Nutcracker storyline by incorporating tap, gypsy flamenco and hip-hop dancers, as well as a poet and live musicians.This year will mark the 10th anniversary for "The Nut Tapper," Reginald McLaughlin's take on the classic. He took the ballet and made it into a multicultural p...

O’Hare exposed

By Kaylee King

December 8, 2008

It was 1984 when Robert Burley began his documentary series of O'Hare International Airport.The operations crew drove him to places where the runways ended and the windsocks disappeared. Burley spent four years watching, photographing and experiencing the fields that lay outside the airport that are viewed only aerially by passengers flying in and out fromworldwide destinations.All alone, he set up his large-format camera and wa...

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